Coming to terms with death

Get Email Updates Email this Topic Print this Page

Grizzweed
 
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2010 03:03 pm
@Mentally Ill,
Mushrooms are my gateway to god.
 
The Dude phil phil
 
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2010 03:30 pm
@Mentally Ill,
Mentally Ill;105496 wrote:
I have very recently been contemplating my death (not in a depressed suicidal way, but as a curious critical thinker) and have finally come to terms with it's inevitability.
I always knew that I would die eventually and haven't been suffering from illusions of grandeur that I might live forever, but I had never actually considered the significance of my future death.
After giving it much thought, accepting my death has released me from many of my past preoccupations with material wealth. I will go about my day-to-day activities, day by day, until my body can no longer function well enough to support my consciousness, and I will cease to exist.
I can truly say, I am now ready to die. And, now, I feel more than ever, that I can truly say, I am ready to live.

Does anyone else here share my thoughts and does anyone here have any philosophical analysis of this story?


Hell yeah, man. Reaching a stage where death no longer worries you is a pretty epic thing. I remember when I realized that I no longer feared death, that's when my life became less about basic survival and acquisition of "stuff" and more about just living for the sake of living.

I have nothing to really elaborate on, it's just cool seeing someone who had a similar experience to mine.

Mentally Ill;105496 wrote:




P.S.
I've also tried LSD multiple times over the course of the last 8 months and I can honestly say that my experience with the universe during those times has changed me from an atheist into a person who believes there is something more than the physical realm. I would not call what I believe in "god" because of the connotations that come along with that term, but I would call it a unity of existence, perhaps, or a shared universal energy that permeates everything.

P.S.S.
Please do not attempt to judge my drug use. I know my rights as an individual and will not tolerate any holier-than-thou attitudes. Thank you.
If you have also tried LSD, I would appreciate any insight you gained while on the drug, as I truly believe it to be a consciousness-expanding experience.



I've wanted to try LSD for a while and have had multiple opportunities, but none were practical opportunities (I always had to be somewhere the next day, etc.). I've also wanted to try Psilocybin and Mescaline, but so far I've only smoked copious amounts of weed, but that's more of a creative stimulant (I fancy myself a writer) and a way to relax than it is a life changing experience (it was the first time I tried it, of course).

I believe in a universal energy that permeates everything, but I also believe that energy is something physically measurable and it's evenly distributed through matter. I call this energy.... energy.

I have a Carl Sagan-esque wonder and appreciation of the universe around me, but I still call myself an Atheist for convenience and to quickly identify with others who criticize religion and its dogma. It's not the spirituality (which is what you clearly have, you're still a free thinker) so much that bothers me as it is the brainwashing and the dogma.
 
Mentally Ill
 
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2010 07:29 pm
@The Dude phil phil,
The_Dude;135570 wrote:
Hell yeah, man. Reaching a stage where death no longer worries you is a pretty epic thing. I remember when I realized that I no longer feared death, that's when my life became less about basic survival and acquisition of "stuff" and more about just living for the sake of living.

I have nothing to really elaborate on, it's just cool seeing someone who had a similar experience to mine.




I've wanted to try LSD for a while and have had multiple opportunities, but none were practical opportunities (I always had to be somewhere the next day, etc.). I've also wanted to try Psilocybin and Mescaline, but so far I've only smoked copious amounts of weed, but that's more of a creative stimulant (I fancy myself a writer) and a way to relax than it is a life changing experience (it was the first time I tried it, of course).

I believe in a universal energy that permeates everything, but I also believe that energy is something physically measurable and it's evenly distributed through matter. I call this energy.... energy.

I have a Carl Sagan-esque wonder and appreciation of the universe around me, but I still call myself an Atheist for convenience and to quickly identify with others who criticize religion and its dogma. It's not the spirituality (which is what you clearly have, you're still a free thinker) so much that bothers me as it is the brainwashing and the dogma.




I just read Thomas Thoreau's On Man & Nature and I really related to it now that I'm just living for the sake of living. You should read it, he has a very NOW, natural mentality and philosophy regarding how a person should live.

And, you should try acid :whistling:

Put the dogma on a leash kids...
 
itsalljustbs
 
Reply Mon 8 Mar, 2010 09:21 pm
@Mentally Ill,
Ah death- sweet death!

I have no fear of death, though I prefer it to come while I am sleeping, when the time comes I will embrace it.

Having been around many dying people in my life I have seen that it is not the death but the suffering of the body that people fear most.

The religious are sure there is an after life and that gives them some comfort.

The atheist sees it as an end to thinking and pain so should have no fear.

Those who are undecided seem to struggle most and it is at deaths door that many make that to decision to authentically believe in an after life or not.

The intellectuals are interesting because while denying the existence of a God they will often embrace the scientific principle that matter can not be created or destroyed and the energy that is life will return to the source from which it came.

I find comfort in knowing I have accomplished everything I ever wanted to do with my life regardless of the absurdity of doing those things.

I also find comfort in knowing I have helped many children and people along my journey as an educator and how I touched their lives will hopefully be passed on to many more future generations and through them will help to make this world a better place.

I have no delusions of hell and see any immoral acts I may have committed in my life as bad choices from which I gained a valuable experience.

I measure my lifes worth by experiences and how I have taken responsibility for those experiences and I am comfortable that I have had enough bad and good experiences to say I have had meaning in my life.
 
itsalljustbs
 
Reply Tue 9 Mar, 2010 10:18 am
@Mentally Ill,
Mentally Ill;135702 wrote:
I just read Thomas Thoreau's On Man & Nature and I really related to it now that I'm just living for the sake of living. You should read it, he has a very NOW, natural mentality and philosophy regarding how a person should live.

And, you should try acid :whistling:

Put the dogma on a leash kids...


I believe you mean Henry David Thoreau ?

His books walden, man and nature, etc. were an inspiration to my life and search for meaning.

I gave up a teaching career, big house, 3 car garage, expensive car, and toys and now live in a small solar cabin I built near the mountains.

I chose this lifestyle to free myself from the ties and ideals of society, to take responsibility for my own needs, and to challenge my abilities.

It has allowed me the time to write books and enjoy the simple pleasures of gardening and fishing without guilt.

Once your own survival is completely in your own hands life does take on new meaning!
 
awareness
 
Reply Wed 10 Mar, 2010 05:44 pm
@Mentally Ill,
Basically what you have done is what yogis and Buddhist monks have done for thousands of years. You have turned off this universe and discovered that there is more that what you see, hear, touch and so on. You as consciousness are not going to cease to exist. Only the body dies. You will live on in many future lives (body's). The past one's you cannot remember because those are stored in your Higher Mind. Which you will merge with at the death of your body. The universalness you experienced is the touching of your higher mind which is connected to all other higher minds, thus the universal feeling or experience.
 
itsalljustbs
 
Reply Wed 10 Mar, 2010 06:45 pm
@awareness,
awareness;138439 wrote:
Basically what you have done is what yogis and Buddhist monks have done for thousands of years. You have turned off this universe and discovered that there is more that what you see, hear, touch and so on. You as consciousness are not going to cease to exist. Only the body dies. You will live on in many future lives (body's). The past one's you cannot remember because those are stored in your Higher Mind. Which you will merge with at the death of your body. The universalness you experienced is the touching of your higher mind which is connected to all other higher minds, thus the universal feeling or experience.


This sounds like so many religions based on the unknown that have to be accepted on faith because it can not be proven or disproved.

This kind of thinking generally comes out of the fear that death is really the end!

Basically it is the same scientific principle I stated before that matter can not be created or destroyed and will always return to its source.

The whole reincarnation thing does not fit well with existentialism because it releases people from taking personal responsibility from their lives.

Why would you strive to be the best you can in this life if you can just say "oh well- maybe I will do better next time around!"
 
manored
 
Reply Fri 12 Mar, 2010 02:24 pm
@Grizzweed,
Grizzweed;135542 wrote:
Mushrooms are my gateway to god.
Thats not god, its surreality. God is that beardy guy in the sky that points at you and laughs.

The_Dude;135570 wrote:
Hell yeah, man. Reaching a stage where death no longer worries you is a pretty epic thing. I remember when I realized that I no longer feared death, that's when my life became less about basic survival and acquisition of "stuff" and more about just living for the sake of living.
I agree. Fears are constraints, as we get rid of then, we become more free. Ceasing to fear death did wonders for me =)

Well, I still fear it a bit, or rather, I fear the pain that may be associated to it. But then I hear those teories about the world ending in 2012, my brain mostly just says "so what?" =)

The_Dude;135570 wrote:

I believe in a universal energy that permeates everything, but I also believe that energy is something physically measurable and it's evenly distributed through matter. I call this energy.... energy.
What is the difference between an universal energy that permeates everything and... nothingness? =)

itsalljustbs;137772 wrote:

Those who are undecided seem to struggle most and it is at deaths door that many make that to decision to authentically believe in an after life or not.
I agree. though im certain there are things after death (the end of the consciousness doesnt seems logical possible) I have no idea of what they are, and that seems like a worse situation than being sure of what it is, even if that is nothing.

itsalljustbs;137911 wrote:
I gave up a teaching career, big house, 3 car garage, expensive car, and toys and now live in a small solar cabin I built near the mountains.

I chose this lifestyle to free myself from the ties and ideals of society, to take responsibility for my own needs, and to challenge my abilities.

It has allowed me the time to write books and enjoy the simple pleasures of gardening and fishing without guilt.

Once your own survival is completely in your own hands life does take on new meaning!
Sometimes I think of doing something like that, living isolated somewhere, or as an wanderer, or some other uncommon thing for the sake of learning. But I live only once (In this world and form, Id rather not live another life as an human, if I can avoid it) and spending my life learning to live doesnt sounds like a good idea =)

itsalljustbs;138463 wrote:
This sounds like so many religions based on the unknown that have to be accepted on faith because it can not be proven or disproved.
I agree. there is no reason to believe we have a "higher mind", or that we will lose memory upon passing on to another life, or that there is any universal oneness to feel connected to.

The only reason I believe in afterlife is because nothingness after death is logically impossible.
 
Ross phil
 
Reply Fri 12 Mar, 2010 02:28 pm
@itsalljustbs,
There have been a couple of times when i've thought i was comfortable with death however i then seem to forget about it and when the thought returns im scared of it all over again. I try to tell myself that the reasoning we have to fear death is in fact very little, it is more of a "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself" type situation. Considering how little we know of how we got here in the first place, the idea of death as sort of a next chapter does excite me sometimes. However for the time being im happy to be living this life and if i can accept death 100% then i feel it will only further my enjoyment of the life i am living now.
 
north
 
Reply Mon 15 Mar, 2010 03:39 pm
@Mentally Ill,
Mentally Ill;105496 wrote:
I have very recently been contemplating my death (not in a depressed suicidal way, but as a curious critical thinker) and have finally come to terms with it's inevitability.
I always knew that I would die eventually and haven't been suffering from illusions of grandeur that I might live forever, but I had never actually considered the significance of my future death.
After giving it much thought, accepting my death has released me from many of my past preoccupations with material wealth. I will go about my day-to-day activities, day by day, until my body can no longer function well enough to support my consciousness, and I will cease to exist.
I can truly say, I am now ready to die. And, now, I feel more than ever, that I can truly say, I am ready to live.


good better late than never

Quote:

Does anyone else here share my thoughts and does anyone here have any philosophical analysis of this story?
I would greatly appreciate a plurality of viewpoints on this topic, as I am still currently fascinated by the notion of my own death.





Quote:

P.S.
I've also tried LSD multiple times over the course of the last 8 months and I can honestly say that my experience with the universe during those times has changed me from an atheist into a person who believes there is something more than the physical realm. I would not call what I believe in "god" because of the connotations that come along with that term, but I would call it a unity of existence, perhaps, or a shared universal energy that permeates everything.



life's spirit or life's energy is different from the physics energy

for me there is a life energy , and for us Humans , the Human spirit
 
Transcend
 
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2010 09:48 am
@north,
I've heard a lot about LSD recently and admit I am curious; as I am with marijuana. But it seems to me that these drugs are used in order to intensify a talent (such as writing or making music), or to, as the OP said make them see things differently; or open one's mind. I'm quite unconmfortable with this. Though I see the benefits that such drugs have created (such as the music of Jimi Hendrix and similar artists), I have to question whether it is the person making the music, or the drugs that creates this phenomina.

Or, am I missing something? Does LSD and pot just bring out what is already there? Smile
 
Camerama
 
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2010 11:15 am
@Mentally Ill,
I do not view death as a threshold a concept. IMO, death begins once subsistence fails. Control of consciousness constitutes life. Loss of control equates loss of life. A supported existence is an existence, but a feeble one. Existence + thought + production = Life. Subsistence = Life. Death is decadence of thought. Once mind fails, body fails. They are codependent(correct usage?)

To me, death is not passage into afterlife, but is wedded with all life. It is essential. What is life without an end? Eternity? I believe antithesis creates quality. Every beginning has an end.(Secularly speaking)

Fear manifests itself from uncertainty. Death is certain. Therefore, what is there to fear? I endeavor to accept rather than evade inevibility. As for now, this is how i concern death, agnostically. I indulge in speculation, but no more. Can you blame a teenager? No, you cannot. So don't even try, because i'm INVINCIBLE.(At least for a few more years)

PS, LSD is on my bucket list. Recommendation?
 
Lost1 phil
 
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2010 07:36 am
@Transcend,
Transcend;144028 wrote:
I've heard a lot about LSD recently and admit I am curious; as I am with marijuana. But it seems to me that these drugs are used in order to intensify a talent (such as writing or making music), or to, as the OP said make them see things differently; or open one's mind. I'm quite unconmfortable with this. Though I see the benefits that such drugs have created (such as the music of Jimi Hendrix and similar artists), I have to question whether it is the person making the music, or the drugs that creates this phenomina.

Or, am I missing something? Does LSD and pot just bring out what is already there? Smile


Off topic thought -- Jimi Hendrix had his talent prior to his addiction to heroin. Let's never allow the idea that that which destroyed him had anything whatsoever to do with this musical abilities. In other words drugs took him from us and gave him nothing.

Lost1
 
Transcend
 
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2010 07:41 am
@Lost1 phil,
Lost1;144564 wrote:
Off topic thought -- Jimi Hendrix had his talent prior to his addiction to heroin. Let's never allow the idea that that which destroyed him had anything whatsoever to do with this musical abilities. In other words drugs took him from us and gave him nothing.

Lost1


It's well known that Jimi took drugs throughout his recording career. I'm an avid fan, but to to deny that the drugs impacted on his recordings is, in my view, foolish.Smile
 
Lost1 phil
 
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2010 07:52 am
@Lost1 phil,
Now that I've had my say about drug use...

Personally, I think this is the one and only life we will ever have. I also hope that I have many more years of it. I'm also at an age (62) where only fools attempt to avoid all thoughts that it's now reached the sooner rather than later stag. I've been working on setting a good example on how best to meet my end.

So far I've gotten the end comfortable in my mind, a sort of black velvet with no pain, fear, worry or concerns -- that part is now looking like a not so bad place to be.

If I don't die in some accident - real quick like - I'm still working on the phase between being told and that end, I'm hoping I don't waste a second of it with painful thoughts.

Lost1
 
manored
 
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2010 01:41 pm
@Camerama,
Camerama;144070 wrote:

Fear manifests itself from uncertainty. Death is certain. Therefore, what is there to fear? I endeavor to accept rather than evade inevibility. As for now, this is how i concern death, agnostically. I indulge in speculation, but no more. Can you blame a teenager? No, you cannot. So don't even try, because i'm INVINCIBLE.(At least for a few more years)
Death is certain, but the moment and form of it is not =)
 
polpol
 
Reply Sat 27 Mar, 2010 04:31 pm
@manored,
What about suicide. I think it's the existentialists that came up with the idea that suicide is the only way to go. Some say life is like a tavern. One comes and takes some drinks and then decides he has enough and goes home. Then there's those that will come and stay there until they get thrown out at closing time. Since we didn't decide to come into life, it is only fair that we decide when we get out. I am pretty sure I will chose suicide when the time comes (I'm in no hurry), just to avoid myself the humilation of being disposed of as it currently happens today due to the medicalisation of death. What do you think?
 
Lost1 phil
 
Reply Sun 28 Mar, 2010 09:12 am
@Transcend,
Transcend;144566 wrote:
It's well known that Jimi took drugs throughout his recording career. I'm an avid fan, but to to deny that the drugs impacted on his recordings is, in my view, foolish.Smile


Not as foolish as someone thinking taking drugs will bring out some hidden talent which no one, including the drug taker, has yet to be aware of Smile --


Lost1
 
salima
 
Reply Sun 28 Mar, 2010 09:40 am
@Lost1 phil,
Lost1;145154 wrote:
Not as foolish as someone thinking taking drugs will bring out some hidden talent which no one, including the drug taker, has yet to be aware of Smile --


Lost1


from what i have seen firsthand, the guy taking the drugs thinks his musical ability is increasing, and if the listener is also taking drugs he will agree. maybe taking drugs increases the ability to perceive greatness regardless of whether it is there or not.

jimi had moments of greatness, he did truly touch the sky, and he destroyed himself and his talent as well. some people make that sacrifice. wherever he is now i hope he feels it was worth it and that it was the best he could have done with his life.

i wish someone would invent a drug that would put the musical talent back in a person who has killed it...
because that is so0000000000 way worse than death.:crying:
 
manored
 
Reply Sun 28 Mar, 2010 12:18 pm
@polpol,
polpol;144854 wrote:
What about suicide. I think it's the existentialists that came up with the idea that suicide is the only way to go. Some say life is like a tavern. One comes and takes some drinks and then decides he has enough and goes home. Then there's those that will come and stay there until they get thrown out at closing time. Since we didn't decide to come into life, it is only fair that we decide when we get out. I am pretty sure I will chose suicide when the time comes (I'm in no hurry), just to avoid myself the humilation of being disposed of as it currently happens today due to the medicalisation of death. What do you think?
I dont think suiciding is more respectable than dying in an hospital. After all, if you suicide that means you gave up trying to solve your problems, whatever they be, and if you die in a hospital that means you died trying to live more.

If you want to drink as much booze as you can, you should wait until you are throw out, if you leave early just to not be throw out you will lose a few more minutes of booze =)

Personally I want to live for as long as I want, and I have decided to never suicide. Whenever I die early or late, I will go to the next life anyway, so I will choose late. Perhaps staying here more I will learn precious things for the next life.
 
 

 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.02 seconds on 08/12/2022 at 06:22:19