Coming to terms with death

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Reply Mon 23 Nov, 2009 07:15 pm
I have very recently been contemplating my death (not in a depressed suicidal way, but as a curious critical thinker) and have finally come to terms with it's inevitability.
I always knew that I would die eventually and haven't been suffering from illusions of grandeur that I might live forever, but I had never actually considered the significance of my future death.
After giving it much thought, accepting my death has released me from many of my past preoccupations with material wealth. I will go about my day-to-day activities, day by day, until my body can no longer function well enough to support my consciousness, and I will cease to exist.
I can truly say, I am now ready to die. And, now, I feel more than ever, that I can truly say, I am ready to live.

Does anyone else here share my thoughts and does anyone here have any philosophical analysis of this story?
I would greatly appreciate a plurality of viewpoints on this topic, as I am still currently fascinated by the notion of my own death.




P.S.
I've also tried LSD multiple times over the course of the last 8 months and I can honestly say that my experience with the universe during those times has changed me from an atheist into a person who believes there is something more than the physical realm. I would not call what I believe in "god" because of the connotations that come along with that term, but I would call it a unity of existence, perhaps, or a shared universal energy that permeates everything.

P.S.S.
Please do not attempt to judge my drug use. I know my rights as an individual and will not tolerate any holier-than-thou attitudes. Thank you.
If you have also tried LSD, I would appreciate any insight you gained while on the drug, as I truly believe it to be a consciousness-expanding experience.
 
IntoTheLight
 
Reply Mon 23 Nov, 2009 11:51 pm
@Mentally Ill,
Mentally Ill;105496 wrote:
I have very recently been contemplating my death (not in a depressed suicidal way, but as a curious critical thinker) and have finally come to terms with it's inevitability.


Good. Most people never consider it.

Quote:

I always knew that I would die eventually and haven't been suffering from illusions of grandeur that I might live forever, but I had never actually considered the significance of my future death. After giving it much thought, accepting my death has released me from many of my past preoccupations with material wealth. I will go about my day-to-day activities, day by day, until my body can no longer function well enough to support my consciousness, and I will cease to exist.
Join the club. =)

Quote:

I can truly say, I am now ready to die. And, now, I feel more than ever, that I can truly say, I am ready to live.
"When I thought I was learning to live, I found that I was really learning to die." -- Gallileo

Quote:

Does anyone else here share my thoughts and does anyone here have any philosophical analysis of this story?
Well... I wouldn't say that I "share your thoughts" exactly, but I, too, realize the inevitability of death. In fact, I'm kind of looking forward to it.
I"m not suicidal (though I have been several times) nor depressed (though I have been in the past). I simply recognize that death is the natural end of life and I don't fear it.

This life, for me at least, has been really difficult and I won't be sad when it is over. Oh, sure, I've had some great times and will likely have some great times in the future, but when it's all almost over for me, I won't be sad.

I have absolutely no idea about any sort of "afterlife". This life is complex enough without worrying about another life.

Quote:

I would greatly appreciate a plurality of viewpoints on this topic, as I am still currently fascinated by the notion of my own death.
We all die - as simple as that. Coming to terms with it is, I think, a very rational place to be.

Quote:

I've also tried LSD multiple times over the course of the last 8 months and I can honestly say that my experience with the universe during those times has changed me from an atheist into a person who believes there is something more than the physical realm. I would not call what I believe in "god" because of the connotations that come along with that term, but I would call it a unity of existence, perhaps, or a shared universal energy that permeates everything.
LOL - You're talking to a long-time acid user. I quit in 2000, but I've fried on acid many, many times. I've also candy-flipped.

Quote:

Please do not attempt to judge my drug use. I know my rights as an individual and will not tolerate any holier-than-thou attitudes. Thank you.
If you have also tried LSD, I would appreciate any insight you gained while on the drug, as I truly believe it to be a consciousness-expanding experience.
We could have an entire discussion about acid. I've fried over 200 times, usually taking between 3-4 hits. Most of my trips lasted from 2-3 days (quite exhausting, I'll tell you). Even though I quit acid in 2000, I still have a lot of 'fry-toys' at my house.

-ITL-
 
prothero
 
Reply Tue 24 Nov, 2009 09:12 pm
@Mentally Ill,
Birth is the beginning of personal experience.
Death is the end of personal experience.
Forget about heaven and hell and the afterlife, just maximize your experience while you have the chance.
Take Sominex tonight and sleep, deep and restful sleep, sleep, sleep.:a-thought:
 
Mentally Ill
 
Reply Wed 25 Nov, 2009 12:24 am
@prothero,
well, we can't exactly be sure death is the end of personal experience, but that seems to be the most logical belief...
if you believe that the observer behind your ego is a soul, then death could be something completely different than we think it is
when I took acid one time, I felt detached from my body, like it was alien to me, and I felt like a soul inside a machine
"I" was an observing consciousness and my body was just my body
but what's most likely the case is that my observing consciousness is a product of my biology, in which case, it will be gone when I die
 
3k1yp2
 
Reply Thu 24 Dec, 2009 09:54 pm
@Mentally Ill,
yeah, i pretty much have always accepted death as inevitable, but with me its a sort of apathy towards my death. People (friends and family) have told me that i should care more about my own death because then i'll cease to exist, but if Death comes aknockin, then whatever. Maybe things'll change when i have kids. I'm only 18 now, but one day... either way, i intend to enjoy life best as i can because so far I've spent my childhood raising my brothers.
 
martchelo
 
Reply Thu 31 Dec, 2009 12:48 am
@Mentally Ill,
i just wish i could have an insight just like you. i mean, death is so natural that i find it hard to actually care about, and maybe that means i havent learned how to live properly.
i had an experience with lsd once. i had some crazy toughts. i guess these drugs that make you lose your inhibition just make you accept your inner truths, easily...

sorry for the english!
 
andy1984
 
Reply Sun 3 Jan, 2010 04:38 pm
@Mentally Ill,
i am afraid of dying. i'm a vegan, and my reasons for being vegan are partially to do with my own fear of death and dying. perhaps if i was a hunter or a fisher i would better be able to understand death, having personally inflicted it in something more similar to myself than an annoying insect.

i killed a mosquito last night, it was noisy and i couldn't sleep so i found it and squashed it. there was no moral thought or feeling associated. i'm glad that it is dead. i guess since i couldn't look into its face i don't mind. a dead mammal would be different, i could see its dead face and see my own future.

i feel very isolated from death. i haven't experienced anyone i know dying. my family thought my grandma was going to die a while ago and i went to visit her. a part of me perversely just wanted to see what this death thing was all about. she didn't die (yay).

i do think about death, but until i have more experience with it it will remain alien to me. maybe when i am older and wiser.
 
Mentally Ill
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 02:03 pm
@Mentally Ill,
you will never experience your own death. because it will happen when your life is over and you are no longer in existence to experience it. so don't be afraid of death.
and dying...dying is just another word for living. it's your transition into death, happening as we speak. for some, it is longer than others.
 
Zetherin
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 02:24 pm
@Mentally Ill,
Mentally Ill;117856 wrote:
you will never experience your own death. because it will happen when your life is over and you are no longer in existence to experience it. so don't be afraid of death.
and dying...dying is just another word for living. it's your transition into death, happening as we speak. for some, it is longer than others.


Dying is another word for living?
 
mister kitten
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 04:52 pm
@Mentally Ill,
If one wants to look at life that way, then they could Zeth. I sometimes refer to myself as a dying artist (I'm only 15-years-old:whistling:).
 
Mentally Ill
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 05:04 pm
@Zetherin,
Zetherin;117865 wrote:
Dying is another word for living?


Different connotations, but they describe the same thing. Unless you're immortal, living is dying and dying is living. Progression towards the end.

You could think of dying in a more immediate sense though, like suffering from a bullet wound. But think about people with cancer; they're living and dying simultaneously. What's the difference?
 
Zetherin
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 05:16 pm
@mister kitten,
Mentally Ill wrote:
Different connotations, but they describe the same thing. Unless you're immortal, living is dying and dying is living. Progression towards the end.


The words have different meanings, and we don't often use them interchangeably. I wouldn't say I'm dying another day, I would say I'm living another day. We usually use "dying" when we mean death is immediate or will soon happen.

And we certainly don't confuse the end states of each, do we? We don't confuse dead with alive. We would not say that someone that is dead, is alive, would we? No, people who are alive are not dead, and people who are dead are not alive.
 
mister kitten
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 07:03 pm
@Zetherin,
Mentally Ill;117927 wrote:
Progression towards the end.

Those are the words I was looking for. Well said.

Zetherin;117933 wrote:
No, people who are alive are not dead, and people who are dead are not alive.


Yes, but the end and "progression towards the end" are different as well.
 
Zetherin
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 07:06 pm
@Mentally Ill,
mister kitten wrote:
Yes, but the end and "progression towards the end" are different as well.


Yes, but, as I noted, we don't often use the progression (living or dying) interchangeably often either.
 
Amperage
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 07:24 pm
@Mentally Ill,
The way I view it is that there are 2 camps. One camp see's what we call life as dying while the other camp sees what we call life as living.

Both sides are of course correct but each camp can travel through it very differently.

For me, I look at it as equitable to those who convert to Christianity because "they don't want to go to Hell" and that's as far as they ever take while others begin to live a life with far greater joys, abundance, and meaning.

I guess it boils down to pessimism vs optimism
 
prothero
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 07:46 pm
@Mentally Ill,
"ready or not, here I come" The Grim Reaper
 
NecromanticSin
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 07:54 pm
@Mentally Ill,
Very Happy
Mentally Ill;105496 wrote:

P.S.
I've also tried LSD multiple times over the course of the last 8 months and I can honestly say that my experience with the universe during those times has changed me from an atheist into a person who believes there is something more than the physical realm. I would not call what I believe in "god" because of the connotations that come along with that term, but I would call it a unity of existence, perhaps, or a shared universal energy that permeates everything.

P.S.S.
Please do not attempt to judge my drug use. I know my rights as an individual and will not tolerate any holier-than-thou attitudes. Thank you.
If you have also tried LSD, I would appreciate any insight you gained while on the drug, as I truly believe it to be a consciousness-expanding experience.



I've tried on LSD out during twilight at the beach,and it made me have love for color,nature,and makes me realize to enjoy the present now,and the future but not to dwell. Basically making me think that I should consider what will happen in my future with my actions in the now,but I shouldn't let it over rule my life and not be able to live now. Besides that, LSD also tought me a lot about people themselves, and the things people do. However, i am young and th people i was tripped with probably wasn't the best to ''study'' per say,but I got a basic understanding,and became not only very self aware,but intune with others when i am around and talking with them.
However LSD never made me consider death. Death is just another part of living. Theres a beginning,theres a end. Physically speaking,but spiritually I am unsure of how i feel along those lines. I am not one of believing in recarnation,or heavn & hell, but i believe in *SOMETHING*,once i figure that out i am sure it'll be posted somewhere here.

I was just very interested to hear that LSD was what has helped you. Actually happy to hear people using the drug,instead of abusing it to be honest.
 
Mentally Ill
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 09:40 pm
@NecromanticSin,
"I guess it boils down to pessimism vs optimism"
I'm not a pessimist.

I just understand that every step I take into the future is bringing me closer to my inevitable non-existence. That's why I appreciate life so very much. I live in the present and enjoy my time here and now, because it's the only thing I have, and it's temporary.

"we don't often use the progression (living or dying) interchangeably often either."

We don't use the words living and dying interchangeably because of the connotations (and for good reason). Telling someone you're dying would be alarming to say the least. But, I believe the concepts hold the same philosophical meaning in this context. We are having a discussion on coming to terms with the inevitability of death...

"I was just very interested to hear that LSD was what has helped you. Actually happy to hear people using the drug,instead of abusing it to be honest. "

Drugs in general get a bad reputation because of crack and heroin and things of that nature, but it's so undeserving. In a controlled setting, with people you trust, and a sufficient knowledge to give yourself a controlled dosage, LSD can do wonders for your consciousness. It could also make you psychotic if you don't know what you're doing. But putting a toddler behind the wheel of a car is equally dangerous. I encourage people to do the research, get their LSD "driver's license" so to speak, and have a mind opening experience.
 
andy1984
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 10:20 pm
@Mentally Ill,
as far as the living/dying debate goes... i think that living infers you are alive and doing something. dying is something that you are doing. if i ask you 'what are you doing?' and you tell me you are living i don't really learn anything (i thought you were living and i wouldn't have asked if i hadn't), but if you say you are dying i know you are alive and what you are doing.
 
3k1yp2
 
Reply Fri 8 Jan, 2010 09:54 pm
@Amperage,
Amperage;117962 wrote:


For me, I look at it as equitable to those who convert to Christianity because "they don't want to go to Hell" and that's as far as they ever take while others begin to live a life:eek: with fa:eek:r greater joys, abundance, and meaning.



this idea of converting to christianity to avoid hell has intrigued me for some time now. I am an agnostic who leans rather heavilly towards athieism, but have often wondered if perhaps I should "accept" christ and go to church just to be safe, even though i find much absurdity in the religion. (not Absurd as in Camus) But wouldn't I still go to Hell anyway, even if ther was a God, since I essentially would be converting to save my own skin rather than out of any real caring for God? Looks like if there is a God, I'm damned if I do ad damned if I don't...
 
 

 
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