We cannot escape absurdity!

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Serena phil
 
Reply Sun 2 Aug, 2009 03:16 am
@Why phil,
Once everyone releases their own conception of absurdity, than it can potentially be escaped. But absurdity tends to be the enemy of logic, in which the world has a hard time comprehending logistics. We cannot become logic without it being inconsistently absurd.
 
Tange
 
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 02:12 am
@Caroline,
Caroline;58898 wrote:
How do you know there are no reasons and thus no reasons behind those reasons, how do you know that?
Thanks.


The possibility of there being reasons is even more absurd than there being no reasons or purpose for anything. We don't know if there are no reasons or if there are reasons but is it even relevant? In my opinion There is a higher probability that there are no reasons or objective purpose for anything but if there were reasons would we ever know the reasons? Maybe but we don't right now so even if there is an objective purpose for life I would rather live a life how I want so reason or no reason, it really doesn't matter. If you keep looking for reasons you are likely to go insane or become a fanatic.... That is basically just how i deal with the problem since it is impossible to answer. :brickwall:

The only way to escape absurdity is to just accept the absurdity and stop trying to make sense of the absurd. Just let it be and go on your way. When you except that nothing makes sense and that even if it did make sense it would not make sense (In some weird way), It makes more sense.
 
Caroline
 
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 07:00 am
@Tange,
Tange;81161 wrote:
If you keep looking for reasons you are likely to go insane or become a fanatic.... That is basically just how i deal with the problem since it is impossible to answer. :brickwall:

The only way to escape absurdity is to just accept the absurdity and stop trying to make sense of the absurd. Just let it be and go on your way. When you except that nothing makes sense and that even if it did make sense it would not make sense (In some weird way), It makes more sense.
Yes I can see what you're getting at - I don't spend alot of if any time looking for reasons because there's not alot to find for me but I will ask why are we here and I will always be in awe of the universe and questions it's origin whether I find the reasons or not it doesn't matter because the enjoyment for me is in the wondering.:detective:
 
Khethil
 
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 08:00 am
@Caroline,
Because something feels absurd doesn't mean it is - I think this is an important distinction in understanding the impact of our own perceptions. That it may strikes us as so often has more to do with the perceiver than the condition/situation itself. Further, I'm not sure there's anything wrong with trying to understand these conditions. To simply cast off the issue by not even trying to make sense of something relegates valuable learning opportunities.

Also, if we try to 'make sense' of something there's a number of mental pigeon-holes we could be trying to force it into. Perhaps this is spoken of in the context of "Just accept" - Not sure.

I suppose my point here is that if we brand what feels absurd as 'not making sense', we judge without acknowledging that that lack of understanding is, very likely, in the mind of the beholder.

... perhaps there's not as much absurdity as it seems

Thanks
 
richrf
 
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 08:42 am
@Tange,
Tange;81161 wrote:
When you except that nothing makes sense and that even if it did make sense it would not make sense (In some weird way), It makes more sense.


Some people may be able to do this. Others may just be pretending that they are doing this. Others accept that they cannot and continue to explore looking for reasons. I think all are valid. Probably the most unhealthy is to pretend since the question is being willfully suppressed.

Rich
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2009 08:50 am
@Tange,
Tange;81161 wrote:
The possibility of there being reasons is even more absurd than there being no reasons or purpose for anything. We don't know if there are no reasons or if there are reasons but is it even relevant? In my opinion There is a higher probability that there are no reasons or objective purpose for anything but if there were reasons would we ever know the reasons? Maybe but we don't right now so even if there is an objective purpose for life I would rather live a life how I want so reason or no reason, it really doesn't matter. If you keep looking for reasons you are likely to go insane or become a fanatic.... That is basically just how i deal with the problem since it is impossible to answer. :brickwall:

The only way to escape absurdity is to just accept the absurdity and stop trying to make sense of the absurd. Just let it be and go on your way. When you except that nothing makes sense and that even if it did make sense it would not make sense (In some weird way), It makes more sense.


This is getting to be absurd.
 
Douglas M
 
Reply Tue 11 Aug, 2009 07:22 am
@kennethamy,
Actually there is no reason for living, but there is no reason for dying also. If life is objectively meaningless, so is death. I don't see it as an absurdity, it's just the way things are. Finding a reason to live is something totally personal, subjective. Making a big deal about this whole situation is pointless! :a-ok:
 
richrf
 
Reply Tue 11 Aug, 2009 08:19 am
@Douglas M,
Douglas M;82503 wrote:
Actually there is no reason for living, but there is no reason for dying also. If life is objectively meaningless, so is death. I don't see it as an absurdity, it's just the way things are. Finding a reason to live is something totally personal, subjective. Making a big deal about this whole situation is pointless! :a-ok:


Hi,

The problem I always found with this reasoning is that if there is no reason to live or die, then why are we trying so hard to live? It should be a flip of a coin. Yet, we do struggle to survive? Why?

Rich
 
Douglas M
 
Reply Tue 11 Aug, 2009 10:37 am
@richrf,
richrf;82518 wrote:
Hi,

The problem I always found with this reasoning is that if there is no reason to live or die, then why are we trying so hard to live? It should be a flip of a coin. Yet, we do struggle to survive? Why?

Rich


You have a point. I would assume that the struggle to survive is an innate instinct of all beings. When something gains motion, it tends to keep this motion, unless some external factor interferes. I think this is a good analogy to the question above, which is something that does not demand a "philosophical" explanation. The question about "why do we struggle to live", putting the instinct thing aside, is just a search for a personal reason to live, thus it has no general answer.
 
Judges-Vs-Poets
 
Reply Wed 25 Nov, 2009 01:20 am
@Douglas M,
I did. You will probably think that is absurd though.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Wed 25 Nov, 2009 01:34 am
@Serena phil,
Serena;80890 wrote:
Once everyone releases their own conception of absurdity, than it can potentially be escaped. But absurdity tends to be the enemy of logic, in which the world has a hard time comprehending logistics. We cannot become logic without it being inconsistently absurd.


What does it mean to "become logic"? Sometimes, people think that they cannot escape absurdity when, in fact, they don't want to escape absurdity, and intentionally say absurd things.
 
IntoTheLight
 
Reply Wed 25 Nov, 2009 01:44 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;105768 wrote:
What does it mean to "become logic"? Sometimes, people think that they cannot escape absurdity when, in fact, they don't want to escape absurdity, and intentionally say absurd things.


I think this simple poem can solve this whole logic/absurdity issue:

[center]Night is dark.

Chicken sleep.

Night is long.

Chicken dream.

Reality.

Hey, Chicken-man, wake up![/center]

See?

-ITL-
 
Judges-Vs-Poets
 
Reply Wed 25 Nov, 2009 01:55 am
@kennethamy,
Fear and Trembling posits this very question. But indeed ... they must go further.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Wed 25 Nov, 2009 07:14 am
@IntoTheLight,
IntoTheLight;105771 wrote:
I think this simple poem can solve this whole logic/absurdity issue:

[CENTER]Night is dark.

Chicken sleep.

Night is long.

Chicken dream.

Reality.

Hey, Chicken-man, wake up![/CENTER]

See?

-ITL-


Nope. I am still bewildered.

---------- Post added 11-25-2009 at 08:15 AM ----------

Judges-Vs-Poets;105774 wrote:
Fear and Trembling posits this very question. But indeed ... they must go further.



What question is this?
 
IntoTheLight
 
Reply Wed 25 Nov, 2009 09:23 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;105800 wrote:
Nope. I am still bewildered.[




That was a joke - emphasizing the absurdity. =)

-ITL-
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Wed 25 Nov, 2009 08:53 pm
@Why phil,
Existentialism is largely a pose. But so is every other sort of ideology, philosophy, mythology, etc. etc.

There's a good guy and his opponent. Sometimes his opponent is Evil. Sometimes its Absurdity / Nausea / Bad Faith. Sometimes its Ignorance, or Forgetfulness of Being.
Of course there's always Prejudice. Some like Ego as the Bad Guy.

His virtue might be Intellect or Kindness or Authenticity. Try to find a system without some heroic role. I don't know if it's possible.

I ask myself why a person puts a particular spin on the totality. I like to sniff out the motives behind key-words like absurdity, etc.

It's fun.

No offense. Smiles and handshakes. I could be completely wrong.
 
jack phil
 
Reply Thu 31 Dec, 2009 02:10 pm
@Why phil,
Why;58855 wrote:
Even if we were to find a god and be 100% sure he existed, the very motives and reasons for his existence could be questioned too.


How so? Consider asking Christ why he existed...


Quote:
If there were some motives or meanings, they could also be questioned. You can always ask why. That's why to anything with a conscious that pursues logical knowledge there is no turning away from continuing to ask why. Even if there were bounds to existence as a whole, we could still question what put these bounds into place? why are there bounds? Why is there something rather than nothing


Well, if God is this limit, and God is unknowable, then the questioning would have reached a logical end point. Or suppose that the universe were boundless, how would this be any different than an Unknowable God?

Wittgenstein's thought experiment of 'beetles' in boxes is ample for this question you face.

-MJ
 
windy34
 
Reply Tue 18 Oct, 2011 04:24 pm
@Why phil,
That is true, but no one who believes in God ever tells you that. They always think they have all the answers.
 
 

 
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