2+2=...

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Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 04:16 pm
When we add together two and two do we have (a), (b), or (c)?

(a)- 1, whole number
(b)- 2, numbers added together
(c)- 4, the product of 2 and 2
 
Aedes
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 04:35 pm
@mister kitten,
or...

(d) one seventh of 14
(e) one eleventh of 22
(f) the cubic root of 6
(g) the fourth power of 1.4

This is the thing about an equal sign. These things are all synonymous.
 
Dave Allen
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 04:38 pm
@Aedes,
Aedes;115003 wrote:
or...

(d) one seventh of 14
(e) one eleventh of 22
(f) the cubic root of 6
(g) the fourth power of 1.4

This is the thing about an equal sign. These things are all synonymous.

Assuming we're working in base 10, of course.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 04:44 pm
@mister kitten,
11 (in base 3)....I hope I did that right. Who uses base3?
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 04:46 pm
@Aedes,
Aedes;115003 wrote:
or...

(d) one seventh of 14
(e) one eleventh of 22
(f) the cubic root of 6
(g) the fourth power of 1.4

This is the thing about an equal sign. These things are all synonymous.


Not synonymous. Equivalent. They don't mean the same thing. But they must have the same truth values.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 04:48 pm
@mister kitten,
"Equivalent" and "synonymous" are not equivalent but synonymous?
 
Aedes
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 04:55 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;115012 wrote:
Not synonymous. Equivalent. They don't mean the same thing. But they must have the same truth values.
They are syntactically different but do have the same value. In genetics a synonymous polymorphism is a mutation that results in a different codon sequence but one that does not alter the amino acid specified by that codon. The word synonym, it seems to me, is specifically intended for the situation in which syntactical differences have no bearing on the meaning. 2+2 by definition is equal to 4. There is no difference in the inherent value of either phrase -- they are interchangeable. In French they say quatre-vignt-douze (four-twenty-twelve) to mean the exact same thing as "ninety-two". Again, syntactical difference, but a synonym.
 
Zetherin
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 05:01 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;115012 wrote:
Not synonymous. Equivalent. They don't mean the same thing. But they must have the same truth values.


"2+2" doesn't mean the same thing as "4"? What is the difference?

mister kitten wrote:
When we add together two and two do we have (a), (b), or (c)?

(a)- 1, whole number
(b)- 2, numbers added together
(c)- 4, the product of 2 and 2


(c)
 
Dave Allen
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 05:03 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;115010 wrote:
11 (in base 3)....I hope I did that right. Who uses base3?

Three fingered aliens.

Probably.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 05:04 pm
@mister kitten,
If we are going to nit-pit, wouldn't we be dealing with a sum rather than a product?
 
Pyrrho
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 05:16 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;115014 wrote:
"Equivalent" and "synonymous" are not equivalent but synonymous?


"Equivalent" means equal in value, and "synonymous" means having the same meaning. Look them up in a dictionary; they are not synonyms for each other.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 05:18 pm
@Pyrrho,
Pyrrho;115032 wrote:
"Equivalent" means equal in value, and "synonymous" means having the same meaning. Look them up in a dictionary; they are not synonyms for each other.


Dude, it was wordplay and it ended with a question mark.


Main Entry: synonymous Part of Speech: adjective Definition: equivalent Synonyms:

alike, apposite, coincident, compatible, convertible, correspondent, corresponding, equal, identical, identified, interchangeable, like, one and the same, same, similar, synonymic, tantamount Antonyms:

different, dissimilar, opposite, polar, unequal Synonymous Synonym | Synonym of Synonymous and Antonym of Synonymous at Thesaurus.com
 
Zetherin
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 05:26 pm
@Pyrrho,
Pyrrho;115032 wrote:
"Equivalent" means equal in value, and "synonymous" means having the same meaning. Look them up in a dictionary; they are not synonyms for each other.


Why wouldn't "2+2" and "4" be synonymous? And I'm not quite sure being synonymous necessarily means having the same meaning. "Baking" is a synonym for "hot" according to my source. These words have similar meanings, but not the same meanings.
 
Aedes
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 05:40 pm
@Pyrrho,
Pyrrho;115032 wrote:
"Equivalent" means equal in value, and "synonymous" means having the same meaning.
Isn't value a synonym of meaning? :flowers:
 
Pyrrho
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 05:55 pm
@Zetherin,
Zetherin;115041 wrote:
Why wouldn't "2+2" and "4" be synonymous?



They are mathematically equivalent, but they mean different things. "4" is a number, and "2+2" involves adding two numbers together, neither of which is 4. Look here and here for the difference between "equivalent" and "synonym".

To appreciate the difference between mathematical equivalence and being synonymous, you might want to look at any standard math problem. Typically, one looks for an answer that is mathematically equivalent to something else, but does not have the same meaning. If it did have the same meaning, one would not need to work out the problem.


Zetherin;115041 wrote:
And I'm not quite sure being synonymous necessarily means having the same meaning. "Baking" is a synonym for "hot" according to my source. These words have similar meanings, but not the same meanings.



I don't know what your source is, but ordinarily, "baking" and "hot" are not regarded as synonyms.
 
Aedes
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:01 pm
@Pyrrho,
Pyrrho;115053 wrote:
ordinarily, "baking" and "hot" are not regarded as synonyms.
There is no 'ordinarily'. There is only context.

Man, I went to the Grand Canyon and by high noon it was baking.
 
Kielicious
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:31 pm
@Aedes,
Of all the nit picking going on I still found your post hilarious Aedes.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:42 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;115014 wrote:
"Equivalent" and "synonymous" are not equivalent but synonymous?


They certainly are not synonymous.
The author of "Huckleberry Finn" is the author of "Tom Sawyer" and, "The author of "Huckleberry Finn" is the author of "Huckleberry Finn" , are equivalent propositions. But they are certainly not synonymous propositions. Therefore, "equivalent propositions" is not synonymous with, "synonymous propositions".
 
Aedes
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:44 pm
@Kielicious,
Kielicious;115078 wrote:
Of all the nit picking going on I still found your post hilarious Aedes.


Aedes;115003 wrote:
or...

(d) one seventh of 14
(e) one eleventh of 22
(f) the cubic root of 6
(g) the fourth power of 1.4

This is the thing about an equal sign. These things are all synonymous.
Oh crap, my d, e, f, and g are synonyms of 2, not 2+2. Whoops.

Aedes = dum
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:45 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;115033 wrote:


Main Entry: synonymous Part of Speech: adjective Definition: equivalent Synonyms:

alike, apposite, coincident, compatible, convertible, correspondent, corresponding, equal, identical, identified, interchangeable, like, one and the same, same, similar, synonymic, tantamount Antonyms:

different, dissimilar, opposite, polar, unequal Synonymous Synonym | Synonym of Synonymous and Antonym of Synonymous at Thesaurus.com


K, I already used the thesaurus. Argue with the thesaurus, not me.
 
 

 
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