Favorite Writers Excluding Philosophers

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Reply Sun 27 Dec, 2009 09:42 pm
I'd like to see who everyone likes outside the philosophy genre. I say let's put no limits on this. List as many as you want. Describe them or don't. I think it all connects. A person's fiction relates to their philosophy ?

0. Charles Bukowski -- His poems are OK. His novels and essays are what I prize him for. His style is tight, modern, honest.
1. Henry Miller --- Tropic of Cancer is great. The spirit of this man....
2. Dostoevsky -- The Possessed, Notes from Underground, The Gambler, The Eternal Husband, Crime and Punishment. A genius. A dark hyper-realism. Nothing like him.
3. Nabokov -- Pale Fire, Lolita, Ada, Transparent Things, Strong Opinions. He's a filthy gifted word-slinger.
4. Milan Kundera -- Immortality, the Unbearable Lightness of Being, his literary criticism. One of my favorites!
5. Michel Huellebecq -- this guy is little known but brilliant. The Possibility of an Island / Platform. He's grim, ultramodern. He's like Schopenhauer mixed with Aldous Huxley.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 04:58 pm
@Reconstructo,
Come on, folks. I want to know what ya like out there!
 
Pyrrho
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 05:23 pm
@Reconstructo,
Jane Austen.

(This addition is because the words "Jane Austen" are too short to be accepted as a post at this site.)
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 05:25 pm
@Reconstructo,
She's great. Her books are generally made into good movies as well. I've read Pride & Prejudice, and seen the movies of the rest. Good plots. Ang Lee did a great movie with Pride and Prejudice. Keira is a knife to the heart.
 
Pyrrho
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 05:31 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;115039 wrote:
She's great. Her books are generally made into good movies as well. I've read Pride & Prejudice, and seen the movies of the rest. Good plots. Ang Lee did a great movie with Pride and Prejudice. Keira is a knife to the heart.


She is better than any of the movies made of her books. Much of the subtlety is lost in the films, and they tend to take liberties with the stories as well. My favorite video version of Pride and Prejudice stars Elizabeth Garvie, though I will not presently provide any links to buying it as I do not wish to violate the rules of this forum so early in my membership.Wink
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 05:35 pm
@Reconstructo,
I'm sure you have a point, but movies add something to make up for what they take away. It's always a trade. I read Pride first and then saw two versions of the movie. Ang Lee's was my favorite presentation of the material. Austen's plots are so good that they translate well, despite a little distortion. I may be biased, though, because Keira Knightly is ridiculously attractive...
 
Theaetetus
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:00 pm
@Reconstructo,
Kurt Vonnegut - He wrote many great satirical novels that read quickly, but have much depth in their meanings and stories.

Tom Robbins - Well, his more recent works are disappointing to say the least, but everything before and including Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates is outstanding. His plots are bizarre, and many of his characters are rather odd, but in the end, he writes some of the most poetic literature out there. Too bad his poetry plain stinks.

Chuck Palahniuk - Survivor, Fight Club, and some of his earlier works are excellent, but after Lullaby, his work leaves much to be desired, and it all pretty much stinks.
 
VideCorSpoon
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:06 pm
@Reconstructo,
Rhys Carpenter - Discontinuity of Greek Civilization* is a must read for anyone interested in Ancient Greek civilization, and especially its origins and the theory that climate change influenced the very nature of Mediterranean civilization itself.

Terry Bouton - Taming Democracy* is an excellent book for people interested in colonial, revolution, and national formation in America to 1799. Unlike the typical conceptions of the American revolution (founding fathers, freedom from Imperial oppression, etc), Bouton underlines a deeper class struggle that indeed propelled the revolution from its infancy into the formation of the United states, which in turn, under the federalist cause, attempted to limit popular control in favor of a more isolated, elite minority.

Annette Gordon-Reed - Great legal analyst and has a great book called Race on Trial - Law and Justice in American History.* Unfortunately, Gordon-Reed does not write many of the chapters, but the ones she does write are phenomenal. She does a very good analysis of the OJ Simpson Trial and the exact racial factors that influenced the trial in favor of the defense (and the mistakes the prosecution made a well).

Jane Austen - I agree with Pyrrho in her mentioning. Jane Austen is a fantastic writer and the subtlety and multifaceted levels of her writings are fantastic. Love the movies as well, but not as much as the books. If I had to put my favorite Austen's in order from best to least favorite, I would say; Persuasion*, Sense and Sensibility,* Emma,* Pride and Prejudice,* Northanger Abby,* Mansfield Park.* I would also put in Elizabeth Gaskell and Charlotte Bronte, but Jane Austen is a good representative for the genre.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:10 pm
@Theaetetus,
Theaetetus;115055 wrote:
Kurt Vonnegut - He wrote many great satirical novels that read quickly, but have much depth in their meanings and stories.

Tom Robbins - Well, his more recent works are disappointing to say the least, but everything before and including Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates is outstanding. His plots are bizarre, and many of his characters are rather odd, but in the end, he writes some of the most poetic literature out there. Too bad his poetry plain stinks.

Chuck Palahniuk - Survivor, Fight Club, and some of his earlier works are excellent, but his later works leave much to be desired.


I like all three. Chuck has that stripped down style. Vonnegut has great perspective. I thought Timequake was great, and that was biographical-theoretical. Tom Robbins is just wild.
 
Kielicious
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:16 pm
@VideCorSpoon,
George Orwell was the first author to actually get me interested in reading. I remember reading Animal Farm when I was very young and was just amazed at how he used such symbolism to covey his point. Needless to say 1984 was next on my reading list.

Today my favorite author is Christopher Hitchens, and while some may claim he is a philosopher (I think he did get a degree in philosophy at Oxford) I consider him more of a writer/journalist. I dont only read his god-bashing books but also his articles in Vanity Fair. He is well spoken and very articulate in my opinion.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:19 pm
@Kielicious,
Kielicious;115066 wrote:
George Orwell was the first author to actually get me interested in reading. I remember reading Animal Farm when I was very young and was just amazed at how he used such symbolism to covey his point. Needless to say 1984 was next on my reading list.

Today my favorite author is Christopher Hitchens, and while some may claim he is a philosopher I consider him more of a writer. I dont only read his god-bashing books but also his articles in Vanity Fair. He is well spoken and very articulate in my opinion.


Orwell is great. 1984 is like nothing else. Hitchens is quite a character. I looked up many of his interviews on youtube once. He's a bulldog. I don't agree with him on many things, but I give him credit for his style.
 
Theaetetus
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:24 pm
@Reconstructo,
Cormac McCarthy is another author I have been getting into lately. I really enjoyed both The Road and No Country for Old Men (I have not seen either movie). I really like the style that he uses in both of the books--short, choppy sentences that leave a lot of the interpretation at the hands of the readers rather than the narrator.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:29 pm
@Theaetetus,
Theaetetus;115071 wrote:
Cormac McCarthy is another author I have been getting into lately. I really enjoyed both The Road and No Country for Old Men (I have not seen either movie). I really like the style that he uses in both of the books--short, choppy sentences that leave a lot of the interpretation at the hands of the readers rather than the narrator.



He's one of the best!! Blood Meridian is the wickedest novel ever. Child of God is great too. I read the Road but didn't like it as much as the others. The Crossing is good. But Blood Meridian is unforgettable. There's a character in that book like the darkest side of Nietzsche's superman. (the Judge...)
 
Theaetetus
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:40 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;115076 wrote:
He's one of the best!! Blood Meridian is the wickedest novel ever. Child of God is great too. I read the Road but didn't like it as much as the others. The Crossing is good. But Blood Meridian is unforgettable. There's a character in that book like the darkest side of Nietzsche's superman. (the Judge...)


I will have to read some of McCarthy's other works when I get a chance. I was interested in reading Blood Meridian but I had to knock off Old Country so I can finally watch the Coen Brothers' film adaptation.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:41 pm
@Theaetetus,
Theaetetus;115081 wrote:
I will have to read some of McCarthy's other works when I get a chance. I was interested in reading Blood Meridian but I had to knock off Old Country so I can finally watch the Coen Brothers' film adaptation.


The movie is great. The ending is strange, but I won't go into that. McCarthy has such a great prose style. Man, does he have an ear.
 
Kielicious
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:45 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;115068 wrote:
Orwell is great. 1984 is like nothing else. Hitchens is quite a character. I looked up many of his interviews on youtube once. He's a bulldog. I don't agree with him on many things, but I give him credit for his style.


I dont agree with everything he says either but rather the way he presents it is what I find intriguing.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 06:50 pm
@Reconstructo,
I would like to add D.H. Lawrence to the list. His novels are great and also his Apocalypse is great.
 
Deckard
 
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 10:40 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;115091 wrote:
I would like to add D.H. Lawrence to the list. His novels are great and also his Apocalypse is great.

You beat me to it. That is pretty much exactly word for word what I would have said.

Personally I prefer Lawrence over Henry Miller. Maybe that's a strange comparison but I've always thought of it as a "Do you prefer the Beatles or The Rolling Stones?" type of question.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Tue 29 Dec, 2009 03:47 am
@Deckard,
Deckard;115202 wrote:
You beat me to it. That is pretty much exactly word for word what I would have said.

Personally I prefer Lawrence over Henry Miller. Maybe that's a strange comparison but I've always thought of it as a "Do you prefer the Beatles or The Rolling Stones?" type of question.



Lawrence is better in some ways. He's a messenger, a prophet. Miller is bit too much of a clown to be a true messenger. Lawrence is holy. Miller is a balloon popper.

The Apocalypse really moved me. He brought home "paganism" for me. He mixes well with Blake. And then his novels are so well written, subject matter aside, which is also great.


If it's all of the Stones or all of the Beatles, I must pick the Beatles. But there was I time I would have said The Stones. ....
 
BeatsMeWhy
 
Reply Tue 29 Dec, 2009 12:15 pm
@Reconstructo,
Isaac Asimov
Lewis Carroll
Charles Dickens
F. Dostoievski
Terry Pratchett
Edward Rutherfurd
Saki
Raymond Smullyan [1]
P. G. Wodehouse

--------
[1] I know he's also a philosopher, but I have no philosophers as favorite writers, I admit I mostly read to have fun, and I can't eliminate from my list the author of many wonderful logic books only because he happens to be a philosopher.
 
 

 
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