Anti-Wizards

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Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 11:37 pm
The Anti-wizard as Transparent Wizard. His game is so clean he's not even there.

---------- Post added 02-23-2010 at 01:51 AM ----------

Onanismo's first and only film-work was enough leader to thread the projector cyclically. One basement showing went on for months.

---------- Post added 02-23-2010 at 01:53 AM ----------

"My next work will be Portrait of the Artist Erasing His Self-Portrait."

---------- Post added 02-23-2010 at 01:55 AM ----------

A prose is a prose is a prose. Ink is platinum. Metaphor promises to translate well. Sense-objects as a vocabulary.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Tue 23 Feb, 2010 11:34 pm
@Reconstructo,
I wasn't 100 percent sober when I started this thread last night. I use "wizard" as a symbol for the intellectual hero. Einstein as Merlin. Reconceptualization as the turning of water to wine. I'm using magic as a metaphor for invention. The wizard is an illusionist.
An anti-wizard is the wizard whose illusion is known as non-fiction.
 
Krumple
 
Reply Wed 24 Feb, 2010 07:19 am
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;131724 wrote:
I wasn't 100 percent sober when I started this thread last night. I use "wizard" as a symbol for the intellectual hero. Einstein as Merlin. Reconceptualization as the turning of water to wine. I'm using magic as a metaphor for invention. The wizard is an illusionist.
An anti-wizard is the wizard whose illusion is known as non-fiction.


Um, are you 100 percent sober yet? heh
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Thu 25 Feb, 2010 10:58 pm
@Krumple,
Krumple;131805 wrote:
Um, are you 100 percent sober yet? heh


Yessir, but I am aware that "wizard" is an unlikely metaphor. But here's the thing: is the pursuit of truth, by you-me-whoever, only a practical matter? Or is there something "sacred" about the truth?

I'm an agnostic myself. Keep that in mind. I'm coming from a depth-psychology angle. I feel that man has a built-in tendency to posit numens. In my opinions, skeptics and mystics alike are pursuing a numinous concept. The concept itself varies, but I suggest that there is always some kind of numinous concept driving philosophy.

We trade the idea of the Holy Ghost for another different but also numinous idea -- universal reason. If reason is in no way universal, then there can be no truth, but only opinion. Nietzsche brilliantly questions the will-to-truth in Beyond Good and Evil. If there is God, as many now believe, what is so special about the Truth? If the truth is only good because it is also useful, then we are all just pragmatists.

I use the term Anti-Wizard because the attack on religion is motivated by the love of truth as truth, and not just truth as prudence. The Anti-Wizard is "religious," but his religion is not God but Truth.
 
Krumple
 
Reply Thu 25 Feb, 2010 11:22 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;132665 wrote:
Yessir, but I am aware that "wizard" is an unlikely metaphor. But here's the thing: is the pursuit of truth, by you-me-whoever, only a practical matter? Or is there something "sacred" about the truth?


I don't know if sacred is the word I would use, but it does carry similar weight in my opinion. For the most part, I think in certain ways a lack of truth can hold back humanity from progressing forward. I believe it is the lack of truth that leads us into most if not all our problems. We must respect it, even if it doesn't make us feel good to know it. The worst crime next to murder would be hiding or covering up truths.

Reconstructo;132665 wrote:

I'm an agnostic myself. Keep that in mind. I'm coming from a depth-psychology angle. I feel that man has a built-in tendency to posit numens. In my opinions, skeptics and mystics alike are pursuing a numinous concept. The concept itself varies, but I suggest that there is always some kind of numinous concept driving philosophy.


It is probably something as simple as reality just still isn't understood all that well. Sometimes I get the impression that we are still not out of the stone age as far as understanding the human condition. We like to think we have it figured out for the most part, but I have a suspicion that we haven't even scratched the surface. I mean, Einstein, Kant and The Buddha ring a bell as far as me wanting to disagree with their conclusions about the human mind and reality. I disagree with all three of them but I have nothing better to offer.

Reconstructo;132665 wrote:

We trade the idea of the Holy Ghost for another different but also numinous idea -- universal reason. If reason is in no way universal, then there can be no truth, but only opinion. Nietzsche brilliantly questions the will-to-truth in Beyond Good and Evil. If there is God, as many now believe, what is so special about the Truth? If the truth is only good because it is also useful, then we are all just pragmatists.


Well for the most part truth has to have some kind of application or else it is just a decoration. I don't adopt to any idea that there is good or evil, these definitions to me are so gray that I can barely tell them apart when it comes down to it. It is totally up to how they are applied and the context points to something else and it is that something else which we are really calling good or bad. I mean you can ask the question, does god have free will? Theists will gladly acknowledge that god does have free will but chooses not to utilize it. I think they only say that because the don't want to think that the god they want to believe in would be cruel or inhumane. What good is having free will if you choose not to utilize it? Might as well just be a robot.

Reconstructo;132665 wrote:

I use the term Anti-Wizard because the attack on religion is motivated by the love of truth as truth, and not just truth as prudence. The Anti-Wizard is "religious," but his religion is not God but Truth.


I'm not to worried about knowing everything or even understanding everything. I just don't want to be misled by untruths. I would rather not know or understand something then to follow something that was a lie. I would rather live in a harsh, uncaring universe then to play make believe to make myself feel better about it.

I don't want to be a guinea pig for some elitist who just uses my life to make his better. That he can tell me that he has my best interest in mind but really doesn't give even an ounce of concern for it. I see myself in others, I don't wish to be above them or better than them, I just want the same chances as them. I don't want them to be test subjects for making the rich richer either, so I protest, speak out and generally have inexhaustible patience to educate those who have already been hypnotized by the illusionist. (there stole your wizard idea)
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Thu 25 Feb, 2010 11:30 pm
@Krumple,
Krumple;132677 wrote:
I'm not to worried about knowing everything or even understanding everything. I just don't want to be misled by untruths. I would rather not know or understand something then to follow something that was a lie. I would rather live in a harsh, uncaring universe then to play make believe to make myself feel better about it.

I don't want to be a guinea pig for some elitist who just uses my life to make his better. That he can tell me that he has my best interest in mind but really doesn't give even an ounce of concern for it. I see myself in others, I don't wish to be above them or better than them, I just want the same chances as them. I don't want them to be test subjects for making the rich richer either, so I protest, speak out and generally have inexhaustible patience to educate those who have already been hypnotized by the illusionist. (there stole your wizard idea)


To me, this transcends truth-as-prudence. Why suffer the truth if it isn't "sacred" or "numinous"? Why endure a godless universe if accurate perception isn't a numen? I frankly confess that Reason is a numen for me. In fact, it was this pseudo-sacred desire for truth that led me to question the will-to-truth in the first place. Nietzsche clicked for me because he was asking a valid question. Why truth? Why not rather untruth? If it lies makes us happy, why suffer for the truth? Sophia is a Goddess. Beatrice led Dante to heaven. "Beauty is the splendor of truth."

I completely agree with your moral outlook. Yes, illusionist is a good. It's exactly what I mean. An anti-wizard hates false truth because he loves the real truth not only for its practical value but because it is The Truth.

With respect,
Reconstructo
 
Krumple
 
Reply Thu 25 Feb, 2010 11:37 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;132681 wrote:
To me, this transcends truth-as-prudence. Why suffer the truth if it isn't "sacred" or "numinous"? Why endure a godless universe if accurate perception isn't a numen? I frankly confess that Reason is a numen for me. In fact, it was this pseudo-sacred desire for truth that led me to question the will-to-truth in the first place. Nietzsche clicked for me because he was asking a valid question. Why truth? Why not rather untruth? If it lies makes us happy, why suffer for the truth? Sophia is a Goddess. Beatrice led Dante to heaven. "Beauty is the splendor of truth."


Lies to me are like a drug addict who believes the only good way to find some contentment is to get high. This is the best solution as far as the addict is concerned but I say it can't be the best solution, there has to be a better method.

So I don't want to be led by the illusions even if they make me feel wonderful to do it. The truth is not always as appealing, but that is exaclty how an addict sees life when not high. I want to learn to cope with the truth rather than chase after butterflies and fairies.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Sat 27 Feb, 2010 07:09 pm
@Krumple,
Krumple;132683 wrote:

So I don't want to be led by the illusions even if they make me feel wonderful to do it. The truth is not always as appealing, but that is exaclty how an addict sees life when not high. I want to learn to cope with the truth rather than chase after butterflies and fairies.


I feel you. I want even the ugly truth. But it occurs to me lately that there is a kind of truth that is beautiful in itself. Pythagoras and Parmenides were high on it. Plato snorted it. It's the structure of the mind itself that is beautiful. Life is messy. Life is temporal flux that craves perhaps the eternal. It's only math and transcendental philosophy that can offer this as truth. It's a beautiful kind of truth. It serves the religious and epistemological need simultaneously. Of course life demands much more than this, but I see this as one of the pure things that does not cost much.
 
Arjuna
 
Reply Sat 27 Feb, 2010 07:33 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;133410 wrote:
I feel you. I want even the ugly truth. But it occurs to me lately that there is a kind of truth that is beautiful in itself. Pythagoras and Parmenides were high on it. Plato snorted it. It's the structure of the mind itself that is beautiful. Life is messy. Life is temporal flux that craves perhaps the eternal. It's only math and transcendental philosophy that can offer this as truth. It's a beautiful kind of truth. It serves the religious and epistemological need simultaneously. Of course life demands much more than this, but I see this as one of the pure things that does not cost much.

The anti-wizard's magic wand turns the dramatic scene on the tv to digital light play. What's left when he pops all the illusions?

Anytime you put one foot in front of the other... you've embraced blind faith.

The structure of the mind itself... yes, that's the thing
 
Krumple
 
Reply Sat 27 Feb, 2010 08:06 pm
@Arjuna,
Arjuna;133417 wrote:
Anytime you put one foot in front of the other... you've embraced blind faith.


Again, I think saying that is one of those attempts to try and inject faith into some common thing you can't escape. To somehow give it legitimacy or something. It is silly though and quite honestly, dishonest.

For the most part, we experience reality as casual observers. We really don't expect or hope for any experience to be any certain way. There are certain cases when we do, like for example, the existence of god. But for the most part, every day walking, you don't honestly hope or expect every step to be firmly planted. I know this is a fact, because if we had such faith no one would ever trip, or fall down. The real fact of the matter is, we just observe and react to the experience. If gravity all of a sudden stopped we would try to cope with it as best we could. Sure people would be wondering what the hell is going on, but they surely wouldn't be completely puzzled why their faith in gravity just failed.
 
Arjuna
 
Reply Sat 27 Feb, 2010 08:32 pm
@Krumple,
Krumple;133421 wrote:
If gravity all of a sudden stopped we would try to cope with it as best we could. Sure people would be wondering what the hell is going on, but they surely wouldn't be completely puzzled why their faith in gravity just failed.
I guess if gravity suddenly failed, we'd find ourselves flying 1000 miles per hour into outer space. Weeeeee!

But when it comes to math and beauty... I have strong feelings about sine waves. Seriously.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Sat 27 Feb, 2010 08:44 pm
@Krumple,
Krumple;133421 wrote:

For the most part, we experience reality as casual observers. We really don't expect or hope for any experience to be any certain way.


I don't know, Krumple. Hegel's made a strong case that as far as human time is concerned, the future takes primacy. We are the animal of the numinous project. Our spatial present is shaped by the future we imagine and desire.

---------- Post added 02-27-2010 at 09:46 PM ----------

Arjuna;133427 wrote:

But when it comes to math and beauty... I have strong feelings about sine waves. Seriously.

Me too. I used to make some of most "experimental" computer music imaginable, and I built it out of sine waves, square waves, and sawtooth waves. I used the old just scale, and scales unknown to man. It was a nice way to play with number and music simultaneously.
 
Arjuna
 
Reply Sat 27 Feb, 2010 09:36 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;133432 wrote:
Me too. I used to make some of most "experimental" computer music imaginable, and I built it out of sine waves, square waves, and sawtooth waves. I used the old just scale, and scales unknown to man. It was a nice way to play with number and music simultaneously.
Bizarre! I want to hear it. What's the experience like?
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Sun 28 Feb, 2010 01:47 am
@Arjuna,
Arjuna;133447 wrote:
Bizarre! I want to hear it. What's the experience like?


1. Here's a link to some of the better stuff. It's the jagged stuff I tended toward finally. But it all began with a piece of reverberated white-noise that I called Being. I didn't know Parmenides then, but that's what I was saying. Being is one, although it is noise. (I now realize that there is only one number...) unanimo on MySpace Music - Free Streaming MP3s, Pictures & Music Downloads

2. I was "elevated " much of the time. I had this textbook on music theory, all the intervals and wave-types and wave-interference. At first I used Qbasic which is a programming language. I programmed the computer to improvise with, in some cases, a ridiculous degree of artificial intelligence. Morpheus Prime. The music changed scale, tempo, rhythm, and it's rate of change. It was as much a logarithmic scupture as something for the ear to enjoy. It was very Pythagoras I realize. But this isn't really surprising, because all this stuff is transcendental (= universal/eternal).

But that old computer broke so I started generating tones in Audacity and cutting and pasting like mad, copying and stretching. The music that link will take you to is the later method's excretion. Thanks for asking, as it's fun to drag this forgotten obsession from the closet.
 
 

 
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