Does a+b=c?

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Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 12:10 pm
This is sort of an offshoot of the "this sentence is false thread". I think the solution to this question might be simpler than the solution to that one, which of course, may have the same solution as whether the chicken or egg came first.

Does a+b=c?

Is it any more correct to say true rather than false?

Is this a nonsense question?

?

I don't really know where to start, so I hope others will.
 
mark noble
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 12:38 pm
@jack phil,
Hi Jack,

Yes - a+b=c
Thank you Jack, and have a great day.
Mark...
 
mister kitten
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 12:56 pm
@jack phil,
Give values to the variables and we'll see.
 
fast
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 01:02 pm
@jack phil,
[QUOTE=jack;174719]This is sort of an offshoot of the "this sentence is false thread". I think the solution to this question might be simpler than the solution to that one, which of course, may have the same solution as whether the chicken or egg came first.

Does a+b=c?

Is it any more correct to say true rather than false?

Is this a nonsense question?

?

I don't really know where to start, so I hope others will.[/QUOTE]

You seem to have written an equation where the summation of variables 'a' and 'b' equals the value of variable 'c'.

The proposition "one plus two equals three" is true. The proposition "three plus two equals eleven" is false. The sentence "Reconstruction plus a theater equals a noble effort" expresses no proposition--nothing that makes any sense at all; I assure you.
 
sometime sun
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 01:02 pm
@mister kitten,
Does a+b=c?
From what I know the answer is no.
a+b=a+b

or possibly somewhere a=a+b=a+b+c

axb=ab I think somewhere
 
Owen phil
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 01:32 pm
@jack phil,
jack;174719 wrote:
This is sort of an offshoot of the "this sentence is false thread". I think the solution to this question might be simpler than the solution to that one, which of course, may have the same solution as whether the chicken or egg came first.

Does a+b=c?

Is it any more correct to say true rather than false?

Is this a nonsense question?

?

I don't really know where to start, so I hope others will.


a+b=c, is not a proposition at all, it has no truth or falsity.

Open sentences like this, where some of the variables are free, are propositional functions not propositions.

An instance of the propositional function (a+b=c) is (2+3=5), which is a true proposition.

"Is this a nonsense question?"

No, it is a proposition when the variables are replaced by constant values.
Therefore, it does have sense.
 
Huxley
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 01:33 pm
@sometime sun,
I would interpret this to mean

"A number 'a' added to a number 'b' equals a number 'c'"

By "a number", I mean the general concept of a specific number within the set "All Real Numbers".

Then, yes, this would be true, as any specific real number added to any specific real number equals another specific real number.
 
mark noble
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 01:33 pm
@sometime sun,
Hi All,
There is no need to try and fathom this one out - The answer is in the question itself. Don't study it, see it.
a+b=c
Have no doubt. Sets have nothing to do with it.
The seemingly obvious is so often the last thing we understand.
Have a brilliant day, each of you, with the requested exception of 'Fast', of course.

Mark...
 
xris
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 01:39 pm
@sometime sun,
You could convince me it does and you could tell me its nonsense. The point is, do you believe it does? If you do then you must have a certain reason, if you have not, then whats your reasoning? A and B must have less value than C . A is not the same as B or it would be A . B is not the same as A , like wise. We have three values that could be interchanged , such as C-A= B ..it is useful but not valued. Another glass of red might help me.
 
Huxley
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 01:44 pm
@xris,
xris;174767 wrote:
A and B must have less value than C .


Not true. A could be negative, if we take the specific number to be of the set "All Real Numbers"

Quote:

A is not the same as B or it would be A . B is not the same as A , like wise.


Also not true. A could be the same as B if A = B. It is one of the possible numbers in the set of all real numbers. (or any set, for that matter) It was not stated that A =/= B, therefore A could = B.
 
mark noble
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 01:45 pm
@xris,
xris;174767 wrote:
You could convince me it does and you could tell me its nonsense. The point is, do you believe it does? If you do then you must have a certain reason, if you have not, then whats your reasoning? A and B must have less value than C . A is not the same as B or it would be A . B is not the same as A , like wise. We have three values that could be interchanged , such as C-A= B ..it is useful but not valued. Another glass of red might help me.

Hi Xris,
Go for a well developed 2-3 year-old cabernet sauvignon, That should do it.

Think people??? What, other than applied values and characters, do these three symbols represent?

It's easy, for crying out moderately noisily...

See you all soon.

Mark...
 
Krumple
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 01:51 pm
@sometime sun,
sometime sun;174743 wrote:
Does a+b=c?
From what I know the answer is no.
a+b=a+b

or possibly somewhere a=a+b=a+b+c

axb=ab I think somewhere


you could also include it like this:

c = a+b

we don't assume the value of c.
 
Owen phil
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 01:52 pm
@Huxley,
Huxley;174769 wrote:
Not true. A could be negative, if we take the specific number to be of the set "All Real Numbers"



Also not true. A could be the same as B if A = B. It is one of the possible numbers in the set of all real numbers. (or any set, for that matter) It was not stated that A =/= B, therefore A could = B.


Agreed, an instance of (a+b=c) is (2+2=2), which is a false proposition.

That there is no description of what the domain of things (a, b, c) refer to, makes the expression rather meaningless.

It seems we all granted that (a, b, c) referred to numbers.
 
xris
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 02:01 pm
@mark noble,
mark noble;174770 wrote:
Hi Xris,
Go for a well developed 2-3 year-old cabernet sauvignon, That should do it.

Think people??? What, other than applied values and characters, do these three symbols represent?

It's easy, for crying out moderately noisily...

See you all soon.

Mark...
Im afraid its last years Merlot ...nearly plonk but it slips down easily. Four glasses and anything makes sense. thanks xrisppp good nart.
 
mark noble
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 02:07 pm
@Owen phil,
Hi Krumple,
You have it spot on c=a+b
But that's just reversing the inherent. All you are saying is, if a+b=c then c=a+b. That has to be, anyway. But why does a+b=c?

hurry up because I'm off to bed soon and I'm taking the answer to this age-old illusory with me.

Have a nice evening all.

Mark...
 
fast
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 02:11 pm
@mark noble,
mark noble;174765 wrote:
Have a brilliant day, each of you.
Now you know why I think the way I do.
 
Krumple
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 02:13 pm
@mark noble,
mark noble;174784 wrote:
Hi Krumple,
You have it spot on c=a+b
But that's just reversing the inherent. All you are saying is, if a+b=c then c=a+b. That has to be, anyway. But why does a+b=c?


No I am not reversing it. If you are assuming the value of C then you have not understood the equation.

You can not assume the value of c, if you do you are not doing proper math.

c here denotes only the value of the sum of a plus b.

you can try all you want say that c is what ever you want it to be and then try to make it true by adding in values for a and b but if it is not true then the equation is not true.

11 ≠ 4 + 5 (false statement)

9 = 4 + 5 (true statement)

c equals the sum of a plus b

c = a+b

so if c is not equal to the sum of a plus b then the statement is false.
 
mark noble
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 02:17 pm
@fast,
fast;174786 wrote:
Now you know why I think the way I do.


Hi Fast,
I wasn't including you in that gesture. I know you don't like it.
And I don't know why you think the way you do. A) because I don't know how you think. B) I've never bothered to analyse you, or your thoughts and C) I don't care that you don't like me.

Mark...
 
wayne
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 02:18 pm
@jack phil,
Can you really add a vowel to a consonant and get a consonant?
Or are we just adding object A to object B and C then = 2
 
mark noble
 
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 02:24 pm
@Krumple,
Krumple;174788 wrote:
No I am not reversing it. If you are assuming the value of C then you have not understood the equation.

You can not assume the value of c, if you do you are not doing proper math.

c here denotes only the value of the sum of a plus b.

you can try all you want say that c is what ever you want it to be and then try to make it true by adding in values for a and b but if it is not true then the equation is not true.

11 ≠ 4 + 5 (false statement)

9 = 4 + 5 (true statement)

c equals the sum of a plus b

c = a+b

so if c is not equal to the sum of a plus b then the statement is false.


Hi Krumple,
I know the values of a,b+c. I have encountered this before.
All you are saying is, for instance > miles and feet = measurements <> measurements = miles and feet.
There's nothing hidden from the obvious.
We can end this right now and I can furnish you with the values of a, b+c, if you want, just ask, but say "please".

Be well, sir.

Mark...
 
 

 
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