Summer Reading Anyone?

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Ding an Sich
 
Reply Thu 27 May, 2010 01:44 pm
@Huxley,
Huxley;169655 wrote:
Heheh... no way, that'd be nuts, I think. Very Happy

I actually just finished up Critique of Judgment over this previous spring break, so I thought I'd pick up the Phenomenology for the summer.

Fascinating read thus far, I must say, if.... well, not as clear as I might like it to be.


I remember reading Hegel over the winter; I suffered from empty verbiage abuse and od. The paramedics had to stab a couple of syringes of adrenaline into me just to bring me back. When I came to, I finally realized what Hegel was talking about.

Its not that I dont understand what Hegel is doing, it's how on earth he does it that sometimes baffles me.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Thu 27 May, 2010 01:46 pm
@Ding an Sich,
Ding_an_Sich;169280 wrote:

5. Lord Byron - Don Juan (not certain if I will get to this one)

I hope you get a chance to take a look at this. Even if only at some of the key passages. He was a master of the modern tone, a tone he probably largely introduced. I was shocked by how modern it was. And no one I know has enjoyed it. Who reads the classic poets these days? The TV has replaced so much...
Quote:

I WOULD to Heaven that I were so much clay,
As I am blood, bone, marrow, passion, feeling--
Because at least the past were passed away,
And for the future--(but I write this reeling,
Having got drunk exceedingly to-day,
So that I seem to stand upon the ceiling)
I say--the future is a serious matter--
And so--for God's sake--hock and soda-water!


---------- Post added 05-27-2010 at 02:49 PM ----------

Ding_an_Sich;169657 wrote:
I remember reading Hegel over the winter; I suffered from empty verbiage abuse and od. The paramedics had to stab a couple of syringes of adrenaline into me just to bring me back. When I came to, I finally realized what Hegel was talking about.

Its not that I dont understand what Hegel is doing, it's how on earth he does it that sometimes baffles me.


I dig it, man. I went to read Hegel in the orig, after Kojeve made me see his genius. Translation could have been some of it, but it was so diffuse. Still, I read enough to see that K wasn't just making sh*t up. Obviously, interpretation is going to be somewhat subjective. In the end, the ideas are more important. So it doesn't much matter to me how much Kojeve might have added from Marx and Heidegger and his own personal taste. Would you agree?

---------- Post added 05-27-2010 at 02:50 PM ----------

Dosed.;169509 wrote:
Setting out to read Beyond Good and Evil. I might tuck it away though for later. Not sure I want to embark on that just yet.

I love that book!

---------- Post added 05-27-2010 at 02:51 PM ----------

mister kitten;169328 wrote:

-The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury...this summer I hope to start and finish Fahrenheit 451 by him.

Good stuff. I love his plots.
 
Ding an Sich
 
Reply Thu 27 May, 2010 01:54 pm
@Reconstructo,
Reconstructo;169659 wrote:
I hope you get a chance to take a look at this. Even if only at some of the key passages. He was a master of the modern tone, a tone he probably largely introduced. I was shocked by how modern it was. And no one I know has enjoyed it. Who reads the classic poets these days? The TV has replaced so much...


---------- Post added 05-27-2010 at 02:49 PM ----------



I dig it, man. I went to read Hegel in the orig, after Kojeve made me see his genius. Translation could have been some of it, but it was so diffuse. Still, I read enough to see that K wasn't just making sh*t up. Obviously, interpretation is going to be somewhat subjective. In the end, the ideas are more important. So it doesn't much matter to me how much Kojeve might have added from Marx and Heidegger and his own personal taste. Would you agree?


Oh I still read classical poets. TV is simply nauseating to me. I cant stand recycled garbage. Anything relating to television, music, and literature for the past 90 years (aside from philosophy) is worthless. Give me Mozart's Concerto no. 21 and Faust and Im a happy camper.

I agree so long as it doesnt distort the philosophy of Kant or Hegel into a horrific abortion.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Thu 27 May, 2010 02:10 pm
@Ding an Sich,
Ding_an_Sich;169667 wrote:
Oh I still read classical poets. TV is simply nauseating to me. I cant stand recycled garbage. Anything relating to television, music, and literature for the past 90 years (aside from philosophy) is worthless. Give me Mozart's Concerto no. 21 and Faust and Im a happy camper.

I agree so long as it doesnt distort the philosophy of Kant or Hegel into a horrific abortion.


I wish I knew classical music better. I've read more about it than I have listened to it, frankly. I have given a good listen to Webern, Schoenberg, Xennakis, Nancarrow, the weirdos let's say. I love Bach. He was prob the first that grabbed me years ago. Mozart is definitely great. He wrote that little Rondo, right? Hesse works him into Steppenwolf in a great way.

I must say that I do think there is some great rock n roll. This isn't the thread for it or I might post a few videos. TV is generally trash, but there are exceptions, I think. As far as comedy goes, the Larry David Show is hilarious. Some of the modern cartoons are viscous satires.

I agree that if a thinker pretends to expound another thinker and doesn't really address the other thinker, it's crap. Kojeve isn't guilty of this. But let's suppose that some cracked-brain but genius guy misread a great thinker accidentally, and happened to "read in" some great ideas. In this case, I would find a way to forgive him. And just think of the misreading as creative. Smile

---------- Post added 05-27-2010 at 03:14 PM ----------

My summer reading:
more on algorithmic information theory. more philosophy of mathematics. more Kant. I've got a book now that stresses what a likable guy he was, and what a great in-person teacher he was. Not a cold fish at all. A highly social guy. Interesting.
Reading W's Investigations more thoroughly. The TLP is denser in its assertions, and easier to get absorbed in. I'm also rereading that.
I will surely pick the bible again, too. The Gospels and Revelation and all that jazz. The Tao is back on my mind. That's a sublime book.
 
GoshisDead
 
Reply Thu 27 May, 2010 02:24 pm
@Ding an Sich,
1. The Way We Think: Conceptual Blending and The Mind's Hidden Complexities - Gilles Faucannier

2. The Ethnographic Imagination - Paul Willis

3. Voices of Modernity: Language Ideology and the Politics of Inequality - Bauman and Briggs.

4. Whatever fantasy novel catches my eye at the used book store.

5. Something by Camus (not The Plague).
 
 

 
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