Buckminster Fuller

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Reply Wed 17 Feb, 2010 01:16 pm
I am sure many of you have heard of the Buckyballs, Carbon arranged in a spherical molecule of 60 C atoms. The famed scientists named their discovery after Buckminster Fuller, whose book enticed them with a solution to their problem: how else can Carbon arrange itself?

And now we have nanotechnology...

But Fuller was a philosopher. In this regard he was a top dog. Maybe he could be called a Socrates of Today, he main contribution was his love of the tetrahedron and system building around it.

He showed that all the platonic solids could be constructed from the tetrahedron alone. Geometry before Fuller might be called pagan geometry!

And their is a huge potential for a new construction of the solar system, one that surpasses the explanatory power of Johannes Kepler's, with a tetrahedron or octahedron or dodecahedron (4x1, 4x2, 4x3, ...) as central parts- as from theses shapes, nested solids are emergent. And it were the the nested solids that Kepler loved so much.

Elsewise, there is an interesting analog between Wittgenstein's 'atomic facts' and Fuller's tetrahedron as base of all geometry. And we all know that some things are better shown than said.

I have not read Synergetics, I or II, but that looks appropriate enough place to start with Fuller. His other works are highly regarded as well; let us keep this philosopher from falling into the dust of time.
 
Reconstructo
 
Reply Sat 20 Mar, 2010 03:45 pm
@jack phil,
jack;129376 wrote:
I am sure many of you have heard of the Buckyballs, Carbon arranged in a spherical molecule of 60 C atoms. The famed scientists named their discovery after Buckminster Fuller, whose book enticed them with a solution to their problem: how else can Carbon arrange itself?

And now we have nanotechnology...

But Fuller was a philosopher. In this regard he was a top dog. Maybe he could be called a Socrates of Today, he main contribution was his love of the tetrahedron and system building around it.

He showed that all the platonic solids could be constructed from the tetrahedron alone. Geometry before Fuller might be called pagan geometry!

And their is a huge potential for a new construction of the solar system, one that surpasses the explanatory power of Johannes Kepler's, with a tetrahedron or octahedron or dodecahedron (4x1, 4x2, 4x3, ...) as central parts- as from theses shapes, nested solids are emergent. And it were the the nested solids that Kepler loved so much.

Elsewise, there is an interesting analog between Wittgenstein's 'atomic facts' and Fuller's tetrahedron as base of all geometry. And we all know that some things are better shown than said.

I have not read Synergetics, I or II, but that looks appropriate enough place to start with Fuller. His other works are highly regarded as well; let us keep this philosopher from falling into the dust of time.


He did the geodesic dome, right? Very cool. I love the spatial aspect of math. I picked up Synergetics at the library, and it looked interesting, but too much beyond my math knowledge for my full appreciation.
 
 

 
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