Jewish Prayer

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Reply Mon 9 Nov, 2009 01:36 pm
I came across this video which I thought was really interesting.

YouTube - Daily Jewish Prayer & Submission - ?????? ?????? ????

This type of prayer is very similar to how Muslims pray. Do all Jewish sects/groups pray like this?
 
Aedes
 
Reply Mon 9 Nov, 2009 03:00 pm
@josh0335,
The kneeling seems unique, but we do "bow" during certain prayers (like the amidah and veneemar) and cover our face during others. I've only seen kneeling like this among Muslims during prayers, but it may be an Orthodox Jewish practice. I grew up going to a Conservative synagogue, which has a somewhat different liturgy and service style than Orthodox.

I don't recognize the prayer here. The shma is the holiest prayer in all Judaism ("shma y'israel adonai elohenu adonai ehad" = "Hear O' Israel the Lord our God, the Lord is One") This is some other prayer that follows it in a service I don't recognize.

Islam and Judaism have MANY similarities in practice, much moreso than either has with Christianity. God's 'posture' towards earth is more similar in these two religions than in Christianity. The emphasis on law is similar (and even some of the laws are similar).

Part of the reason for this is that for the majority of rabbinic Jewish history, the major centers of Jewish learning and theology were in Muslim lands, especially Spain, Damascus, and Baghdad. These were the major sites of the "Yeshiva", or the institutions where rabbinic scholars wrote the Talmud and other rabbinic texts and interpreted law. There was a great deal of conversation and cross-fertilization with Islam, and many examples of where each religion influenced the other.
 
josh0335
 
Reply Mon 9 Nov, 2009 04:02 pm
@Aedes,
Aedes;102665 wrote:
The kneeling seems unique, but we do "bow" during certain prayers (like the amidah and veneemar) and cover our face during others. I've only seen kneeling like this among Muslims during prayers, but it may be an Orthodox Jewish practice. I grew up going to a Conservative synagogue, which has a somewhat different liturgy and service style than Orthodox.

I don't recognize the prayer here. The shma is the holiest prayer in all Judaism ("shma y'israel adonai elohenu adonai ehad" = "Hear O' Israel the Lord our God, the Lord is One") This is some other prayer that follows it in a service I don't recognize.

Islam and Judaism have MANY similarities in practice, much moreso than either has with Christianity. God's 'posture' towards earth is more similar in these two religions than in Christianity. The emphasis on law is similar (and even some of the laws are similar).

Part of the reason for this is that for the majority of rabbinic Jewish history, the major centers of Jewish learning and theology were in Muslim lands, especially Spain, Damascus, and Baghdad. These were the major sites of the "Yeshiva", or the institutions where rabbinic scholars wrote the Talmud and other rabbinic texts and interpreted law. There was a great deal of conversation and cross-fertilization with Islam, and many examples of where each religion influenced the other.


In the captions it does say that some of the actions are traditional practises but not codified obligations, so I imagine it is a choice whether one wishes to use them or not.

What also struck me was the beauty of the recitation. I don't understand hebrew but the sound is mesmerizing. Again, the style of recitation is similar to how Muslims recite the Qur'an.

For a Muslim, I see the similarities as a confirmation of my belief that Moses and Muhammad (peace and blessings upon them) were brothers in Prophethood.

When I saw this video I said 'Alhamdulillah' (praise to God), because seeing someone pray is a really heart-warming thing for me.
 
whyNot
 
Reply Fri 14 May, 2010 04:08 pm
@josh0335,
The truth is that the vast majority of Orthodox Jews would not pray that way. In fact, most orthodox Jews consider it a sin to bow with one's knees touching the floor - it's based on a decree which is two millenniums old. Since, in ancient times, idol worshipers used to pray that way, it was decreed that Jews cannot bow down to the floor.

I find it very unusual, and even a bit suspicious, that an Orthodox Jew is shown bowing all the way to the floor. It makes me wonder about the knowledge and integrity of whoever actually made that video.

If anyone is really curious, I could probably dig up an authoritative text (for Orthodox Jews, that is) which states the decree outright.
 
 

 
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