Abrahamic scriptures

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Reply Thu 31 Jul, 2008 12:54 pm
There are more is more to abrahamic scripture than just the KJV bible. Here I shall list the a few.
I will put a link up so you can read the books if you so wish, but if I'm not allowed to do this can a mod say so, so that I dont get into trouble.
In this thread, I aim to bring about the debates as to questions surrounding the many scriptures. For example, why are there so many? What is the significance of the scriptures that are not in the bible but predate jesus? Should the church consider them? etc etc.


PS: If I have missed out a scripture attributed to abrahamic religion or have made a mistake, please say so.

I think research should go into all the older scriptures so that a more accurate and longer account of what happened to some of the prophets can be made.
Say what you think if you've never heard of this sort of thing before.
 
one-philosophy
 
Reply Thu 31 Jul, 2008 12:54 pm
@one-philosophy,
BOOKS http://www.pseudepigrapha.com/bell.gif

No you don't have to read them all, thats very difficult and boring.



Post Jesus-propheticThe Quran- believed by muslims (and me) to be the revalation given to muhammad by God through the angel Gabriel. Its wording is as if it is a direct message from God.
The Book of Mormon- believed by followers to be the revalation given to Jospeh Smith of Utah via Golden plates from the angel, in the 19th century. The golden plates were in a strange language and Smith translated them to English. Then the Plates were taken back to heaven from the angel.
Oahspe- John Newbrough claimed revalation and wrote this book through automatic writing in the 19th century. It is also known as the Kosmon bible.
King James Bible
Genesis- Christian/judaic book of creation and early prophets.
Exodus- The Exodus of Isrealites and Moses from Egypt
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy- Last book attributed to Moses
Joshua
Judges
Ruth
1 Kings (1 Samuel)
2 Kings (2 Samuel)
3 Kings (1 Kings)
4 Kings (2 Kings)
1 Chronicles
2 Chronicles
Ezra
Nehemiah
Esther
Job the guy that suffers a lot
Psalms- Beautiful songs
Proverbs- Wise stuff
Ecclesiastes
Song of Solomon (Canticles)
Isaiah- Prophecies
Jeremiah
Lamentations
Ezekiel- Prophecies
Daniel
Hosea
Joel
Amos
Obadiah
Jonah and the gert big fish
Micah
Nahum
Habakkuk
Zephaniah
Haggai
Zechariah
Malachi
Matthew- A gospel for Jesus
Mark- A gospel for Jesus
Luke- A gospel for Jesus
John- A Gospel for Jesus
Acts- Actions of some of the deciples
Romans
1 Corinthians
2 Corinthians
Galatians
Ephesians
Philippians
Colossians
1 Thessalonians
2 Thessalonians
1 Timothy
2 Timothy
Titus
Philemon
Hebrews
James
1 Peter
2 Peter
1 John
2 John
3 John
Jude
Revelation given to John of things to come to pass at the end of days

Apocrypha (Deuturo-canonical)
1 Esdras
2 Esdras
Additions to Esther
1 Macabees
2 Macabees
Tobias
Judith
Wisdom of Solomon
Sirach
Baruch
Epistle of Jeremiah
Susanna
Prayer of Azariah- chapters that are placed with the book of Daniel
Prayer of Manasseh- chapters that are placed with the book of Daniel
Bel and the Dragon- chapters that are placed with the book of Daniel
Laodiceans


Pseudepigrapha
The First Book of Adam and Eve
The Second Book of Adam and Eve- Adam and Eve have a daughter!!!!
The Book of the Secrets of Enoch
The Psalms of Solomon
The Odes of Solomon
The Letter of Aristeas
Fourth Book of Maccabees
The Story of Ahikar
The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
Testament of Reuben
Testament of Simeon
Testament of Levi
The Testament of Judah
The Testament of Issachar
The Testament of Zebulun
The Testament of Dan
The Testament of Naphtali
The Testament Of Gad
The Testament of Asher
The Testament of Joseph
The Testament of Benjamin
The Last 12 testimonies are from the children of Jacob (aka israel)

Nag Hammadi Library
The Gospel of Thomas
Oxyrhynchus 1224 Gospel
The Egerton Gospel
The Gospel of Peter
Secret Mark
The Gospel of the Egyptians
The Secret Book of James
The Oxyrhynchus 840 Gospel
The Gospel of Mary
The Dialogue of the Savior
The Infancy Gospel of James- when Jesus was a young whipper snapper
The Infancy Gospel of Thomas- My favourite, Jesus as a tyke
The Acts of Peter
The Acts of John
The Acts of Paul
The Acts of Andrew
The Acts of Peter and the Twelve
The Book of Thomas the Contender
The Acts of Thomas
 
Aedes
 
Reply Fri 1 Aug, 2008 09:17 pm
@one-philosophy,
We Jews don't particularly follow the King James Bible. There are lots of translations of the original Torah and Haftorah. It seems that Genesis (et al.) get translated in a way that's consistent with the theology of the translator.

So which language did God use to inspire the words of his scriptures? Because different translations are not exactly the same book.
 
one-philosophy
 
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2008 12:46 am
@Aedes,
sorry, the thing duplicated itself

As far as I am aware, the dead sea scrolls were originally in hebrew. Then you got the whole story of 70 AD when the romans took ever jerusalam. I think the story goes that the jewish use to have greek and hebrew scriptures leading to slightly different accounts, but after the romans invaded they didn't want anything to do with the west so I think thats why they got rid of many of the greek books. The catholics choose to keep the greek books and subsequently these extra books that are in greek but not hebrew is often called apocrypha or deuturo-canonical. Thats what a christian priest said to me anyway.
Most of the Nag hammadi library or "extra books attributed to jesus that are not in the new testement" are in aramaic (another semetic language similar to arabic and hebrew).
The Quran is in arabic, Oahspe in english, and the book of mormon I think is in some sort of egyptian/hebrew language, but was translated to english by John Smith and the original book of mormon which was a set of golden plates was taken back to heaven.

Aedes wrote:
We Jews don't particularly follow the King James Bible. There are lots of translations of the original Torah and Haftorah. It seems that Genesis (et al.) get translated in a way that's consistent with the theology of the translator.

So which language did God use to inspire the words of his scriptures? Because different translations are not exactly the same book.


Then whats the different areas of the jewish book then? All I sort of know is that the first five books are called the pentatauch or torah. In school we were only taught christianity and scimmed all other religions as if they werent important. Ha! Since I've been studying abrahmic scriptures I got to the best of my religion+Philosophy class! MWUHAHAHAHAHAAAHAAAAAA!!!!
*cough cough, we muslims don't tend to laugh in an evil way because we're not evil.
Well maybe some of us our, Bin Ladan for example (Last year in ramadan, another muslim said that as a child, he saw Bin Laden with US soldiers going around collecting money for "jihad", bit fishy huh?).
 
Didymos Thomas
 
Reply Tue 5 Aug, 2008 10:05 pm
@Aedes,
Quote:
We Jews don't particularly follow the King James Bible. There are lots of translations of the original Torah and Haftorah. It seems that Genesis (et al.) get translated in a way that's consistent with the theology of the translator.


Is there a particular translation into English of these Jewish scriptures that Jews prefer?

My personal Bible is KJV, and I always find myself searching for alternative ways of translating passages. Oh, the burden of knowing...
 
one-philosophy
 
Reply Wed 6 Aug, 2008 07:15 am
@Didymos Thomas,
I think from my own knowledge, there are writings from jewish scholars, rabbis and kings even though they were not prophets. I also think the jews have the kabballah which talks of creation and hebrew letters but I found it confusing.
 
Didymos Thomas
 
Reply Wed 6 Aug, 2008 03:23 pm
@one-philosophy,
Kabballah is a mystical form of Judaism. Sort of like Sufism in Islam.
 
Aedes
 
Reply Sat 9 Aug, 2008 09:39 pm
@Aedes,
one-philosophy wrote:
Then whats the different areas of the jewish book then? All I sort of know is that the first five books are called the pentatauch or torah.
Correct, but the whole thing is called the Tanakh, and includes the Haftorah, which are books from the prophets (like Daniel, Ezekiel, etc).

As Didymos Thomas says the Kaballah is a unique tradition of Jewish mysticism that arose in Europe in the late medieval / early modern period. Most Jewish law does NOT come from the Bible, however. It comes from the Talmud, which were commentaries written over the last 2000 years since the destruction of the second temple. Rabbinic Judaism, which accounts for nearly all Judaism in the modern world, was an outgrowth of the Pharisees after the destruction of the second temple by the Romans in 71 AD. Judaism ceased to be a priestly religion after that point and completely changed in character.

Thus, while Judaism, Christianity, and Islam may all call upon the same original story, Judaism diverged along a greatly different path at the same time as the birth of Christianity. So the Judaism that Christianity grew out of was completely different than the Judaism of today.

True for Islam as well -- which arose well before most of the theological development of modern Christianity and Judaism.

To be sure, Jews were so prominent in Muslim lands since the very beginning of Islam that there was a lot of convergence between the two. So that is why the Hallal laws and the Kashrut (kosher) laws are so similar -- not because they are from the same scriptural source, but because they arose in an environment of cross-fertilization between Jewish and Muslim scholars. The most intellectually successful and theologically important Jewish communities in the last 2000 years were in Baghdad, Damascus, and Cordoba, i.e. all in lands that were the crown jewels in the "golden age of Islam".
 
 

 
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