Camus' Paneloux

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Reply Mon 8 Mar, 2010 03:16 pm
I was reading Camus' The Plague this week and among the many things I highlighted, I highlighted the following passage. Said by Paneloux the priest after having witnessed months of plague and specifically the suffering of the prefect's son as he died. In his subsequent sermon to his congregation in what seems to be a monologue of shattering faith he says this.

"For who would dare to assert that eternal happiness can compensate for a single moment of human suffering?"

This is a question that, growing up religious, I never would have thought. What think you all?
 
Insty
 
Reply Mon 8 Mar, 2010 06:22 pm
@GoshisDead,
GoshisDead;137649 wrote:
I was reading Camus' The Plague this week and among the many things I highlighted, I highlighted the following passage. Said by Paneloux the priest after having witnessed months of plague and specifically the suffering of the prefect's son as he died. In his subsequent sermon to his congregation in what seems to be a monologue of shattering faith he says this.

"For who would dare to assert that eternal happiness can compensate for a single moment of human suffering?"

This is a question that, growing up religious, I never would have thought. What think you all?

I disagree. I think eternal happiness could compensate for a single moment of human suffering. But in the case of certain deeper and more protracted forms of suffering, I'm not sure.

I seem to remember Dostoevsky making a similar point in the Brothers Karamazov.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Mon 8 Mar, 2010 07:57 pm
@Insty,
Insty;137711 wrote:
I disagree. I think eternal happiness could compensate for a single moment of human suffering. But in the case of certain deeper and more protracted forms of suffering, I'm not sure.

I seem to remember Dostoevsky making a similar point in the Brothers Karamazov.



Yes indeed. In the chapter, "The Grand Inquisitor".

The Grand Inquisitor/Rebellion (Part 2) - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks
 
GoshisDead
 
Reply Mon 8 Mar, 2010 08:48 pm
@kennethamy,
maybe what I'm trying to get out is:

is this quote simply an existential one in the hand is worth two in the bush sort of thing, or is it something deeper than that.

the priest finishes his sermon by stating that given this scenario we must either place nothing in God's hands or place everything in God's hands.
 
 

 
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