What makes a good philosopher?

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PappasNick
 
Reply Thu 11 Mar, 2010 06:59 pm
@jeeprs,
jeeprs;138780 wrote:
Actually it was pretty open-and-shut. The question was about IQ testing methodolgy. It was the first Uni essay I actually attempted. But instead of writing up the pros and cons of the various methods we had read about I wrote an essay on whether intelligence was something that could be tested. The comment simply was 'F - Wrong department'. So I went and asked the lecturer and she said that I simply didn't answer the question. And I hadn't - so really I had no leg to stand on, I realised. But I passed the rest of the year, so I put it down to a learning experience.

I remained very combative about behaviourism, positivism, or whatever I diagnosed as 'philosophical materialism', but I generally did OK after that. I don't think I failed anything else but I had a few heated debates.


I bet the essay you wrote on whether intelligence can be tested was much more interesting than any of the other essays in that class.
 
north
 
Reply Thu 11 Mar, 2010 08:55 pm
@hue-man,
hue-man;71114 wrote:
I believe that in order to be a good philosopher one must do the following things:

1. Rid themselves of anthropocentricity.

2. Think critically about all arguments, including their own; and follow a logical conclusion to wherever it may lead.

3. Accept the truth, even when it's inconvenient.

4. Balance emotion with logic.

I would sum up a bad philosopher with the following sentence:

The hallmark of a bad philosopher is that they seek appeasement first and truth second.


agreed

but I would add further to the list ;

ability to Reason and be objective , as well
 
pondfish
 
Reply Thu 11 Mar, 2010 09:06 pm
@north,
There is no truth!. Only beliefs.:bigsmile:
 
north
 
Reply Thu 11 Mar, 2010 09:16 pm
@pondfish,
pondfish;138821 wrote:
There is no truth!. Only beliefs.:bigsmile:


so you think that the need for air by you is not a truth Very Happy
 
pondfish
 
Reply Thu 11 Mar, 2010 09:55 pm
@hue-man,
You need to define truth. Then i disprove it.

Smile

---------- Post added 03-11-2010 at 10:56 PM ----------

Everything is true in certain context and false in another context. Context is a bundle of assumptions. Boundary and conditions.

Things can be only truth within certain context , as you stretch the context truth become false.
 
north
 
Reply Thu 11 Mar, 2010 10:08 pm
@pondfish,
Quote:

pondfish;138835 wrote:
You need to define truth. Then i disprove it.

Smile


that which cannot be cannot be disproved




---------- Post added 03-11-2010 at 10:56 PM ----------

Quote:

Everything is true in certain context and false in another context. Context is a bundle of assumptions. Boundary and conditions.

Things can be only truth within certain context , as you stretch the context truth become false.


so what truth has no context associated with it ?
 
HexHammer
 
Reply Thu 11 Mar, 2010 10:26 pm
@PappasNick,
PappasNick;138720 wrote:
I think that philosophy and science, in the older and broader understanding of them, are nearly identical.
Horray for sponatanious genesis then! Very Happy

:poke-eye:
 
north
 
Reply Thu 11 Mar, 2010 10:39 pm
@HexHammer,
Quote:
Originally Posted by pondfish http://www.philosophyforum.com/images/PHBlue/buttons/viewpost.gif
You need to define truth. Then i disprove it.

Smile

that which cannot be cannot be disproved

as I said you can't go without air , context or not , it is a truth

---------- Post added 03-11-2010 at 11:43 PM ----------

Quote:

Everything is true in certain context and false in another context. Context is a bundle of assumptions. Boundary and conditions.

Things can be only truth within certain context , as you stretch the context truth become false.


so what truth has no context associated with it ?

there is no assumptions about the Human need of air

its a fact
 
pondfish
 
Reply Fri 12 Mar, 2010 01:25 am
@hue-man,
Today's truth is tomorrow's false eventually.
 
Jebediah
 
Reply Fri 12 Mar, 2010 08:28 am
@pondfish,
pondfish;138884 wrote:
Today's truth is tomorrow's false eventually.


Was this true when you posted it yesterday and false when I read it today? :devilish:
 
platorepublic
 
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 10:02 am
@hue-man,
There are no rules, guys. That's what makes a philosopher. I could warp the whole universe if I wanted to.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 10:25 am
@PappasNick,
PappasNick;138720 wrote:
I think that philosophy and science, in the older and broader understanding of them, are nearly identical.


So were astrology and astronomy, and alchemy and chemistry, as well as psychology and philosophy, but it is no longer true, is it? People used not to make distinctions that they make now when what was lumped together evolves.

Science provides knowledge, but philosophy provides clarity and understanding. (Some call it "conceptual knowledge") It is a division of labor.

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.

T.S. Eliot.
 
platorepublic
 
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 10:30 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;157127 wrote:
So were astrology and astronomy, and alchemy and chemistry, as well as psychology and philosophy, but it is no longer true, is it? People used not to make distinctions that they make now when what was lumped together evolves.

Science provides knowledge, but philosophy provides clarity and understanding. (Some call it "conceptual knowledge") It is a division of labor.

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.

T.S. Eliot.

I really like that poem by TS Elliott. Can you tell me more about it please?
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 10:49 am
@platorepublic,
platorepublic;157132 wrote:
I really like that poem by TS Elliott. Can you tell me more about it please?


It is the final one of T.S. Eliot's, The Four Quartets. What I wrote was only an excerpt from the final section of "Little Gidding". You can get the entire work on Google (or Bing) and a lot of commentary. You don't need me to tell you about it-not that I know enough to do so, anyway. But Eliot was, perhaps the greatest of English poets of the 20th century, or in any century, (save Shakespeare).
 
sometime sun
 
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 10:51 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;157127 wrote:


We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.

T.S. Eliot.


From Four Quartets

Old men ought to be explorers
Here and there doe snot matter
We must be still and still moving
Into anothers intensity
For a further union, a deeper communion
Through the dark cold and empty desolation,
The wave cry, the wind cry the vast waters
Of the petrel and the porpoise. In my end is my beginning.

I know this has little to do with the thread unless you think this describes what the philosopher immortality is.

Garlic and sapphires in the mud
Clot the bedded axle-tree.
The trilling wire in the blood
Sings below inveterate scars
Appeasing long forgotten wars.
The dance along the artery
The circulation of the lymph
Are figured in the drift of starts
Ascend to summer in th etree
In light upon the figured leaf
And hear upon th esodden floor
Below, the boarhound and the boar
Pursue this pattern as before
But reconciled among the stars.

---------- Post added 04-27-2010 at 05:55 PM ----------

kennethamy;157141 wrote:
It is the final one of T.S. Eliot's, The Four Quartets. What I wrote was only an excerpt from the final section of "Little Gidding". You can get the entire work on Google (or Bing) and a lot of commentary. You don't need me to tell you about it-not that I know enough to do so, anyway. But Eliot was, perhaps the greatest of English poets of the 20th century, or in any century, (save Shakespeare).

20th century for sure.

---------- Post added 04-27-2010 at 05:58 PM ----------

platorepublic if you want a read that will make you smile 'Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats' is a cool read.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 10:59 am
@sometime sun,
sometime sun;157143 wrote:
From Four Quartets

Old men ought to be explorers
Here and there doe snot matter
We must be still and still moving
Into anothers intensity
For a further union, a deeper communion
Through the dark cold and empty desolation,
The wave cry, the wind cry the vast waters
Of the petrel and the porpoise. In my end is my beginning.

I know this has little to do with the thread unless you think this describes what the philosopher immortality is.

Garlic and sapphires in the mud
Clot the bedded axle-tree.
The trilling wire in the blood
Sings below inveterate scars
Appeasing long forgotten wars.
The dance along the artery
The circulation of the lymph
Are figured in the drift of starts
Ascend to summer in th etree
In light upon the figured leaf
And hear upon th esodden floor
Below, the boarhound and the boar
Pursue this pattern as before
But reconciled among the stars.

---------- Post added 04-27-2010 at 05:55 PM ----------


20th century for sure.


I think that the line, "Garlic and sapphires in the mud" is a good description of philosophy.

---------- Post added 04-27-2010 at 01:02 PM ----------

sometime sun;157143 wrote:
From Four Quartets

Old men ought to be explorers
Here and there doe snot matter
We must be still and still moving
Into anothers intensity
For a further union, a deeper communion
Through the dark cold and empty desolation,
The wave cry, the wind cry the vast waters
Of the petrel and the porpoise. In my end is my beginning.

I know this has little to do with the thread unless you think this describes what the philosopher immortality is.

Garlic and sapphires in the mud
Clot the bedded axle-tree.
The trilling wire in the blood
Sings below inveterate scars
Appeasing long forgotten wars.
The dance along the artery
The circulation of the lymph
Are figured in the drift of starts
Ascend to summer in th etree
In light upon the figured leaf
And hear upon th esodden floor
Below, the boarhound and the boar
Pursue this pattern as before
But reconciled among the stars.

---------- Post added 04-27-2010 at 05:55 PM ----------


20th century for sure.

---------- Post added 04-27-2010 at 05:58 PM ----------

platorepublic if you want a read that will make you smile 'Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats' is a cool read.


Yes, indeed. And, believe it or not, it was the basis for a musical on Broadway that had an excellent run. Eliot's plays, "Murder in the Cathedral" and, "The Cocktail Party" (both of which had long runs, and are still being performed) are wonderful too.
 
sometime sun
 
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 11:16 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;157151 wrote:

Yes, indeed. And, believe it or not, it was the basis for a musical on Broadway that had an excellent run. Eliot's plays, "Murder in the Cathedral" and, "The Cocktail Party" (both of which had long runs, and are still being performed) are wonderful too.

Yes i heard about a musical did not think it came from book of cats though.
Would love to see them all.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 11:20 am
@sometime sun,
sometime sun;157159 wrote:
Yes i heard about a musical did not think it came from book of cats though.
Would love to see them all.


The only one I have seen live is, Murder in the Cathedral (about the murder of Thomas a Becket). I watched "The Cocktail Party" on TV. A British production. The musical was called, Cats, I believe. The best way to begin to read Eliot is to read the poem that brought him to universal notice: The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.

1. The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. Eliot, T.S. 1917. Prufrock and Other Observations
 
sometime sun
 
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 11:32 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;157160 wrote:
The only one I have seen live is, Murder in the Cathedral (about the murder of Thomas a Becket). I watched "The Cocktail Party" on TV. A British production. The musical was called, Cats, I believe.

Okay so maybe i dont want to see them all.
Cats? really?
Should have connected the dots a little better.
Cats? really?
I wonder if he would have approved?
But i should not pass judgement on soemthing i have never seen.
At least now there is a reason to see it,
still dont think i will though.
Cats? really?

This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Tue 27 Apr, 2010 11:43 am
@sometime sun,
sometime sun;157164 wrote:
Okay so maybe i dont want to see them all.
Cats? really?
Should have connected the dots a little better.
Cats? really?
I wonder if he would have approved?
But i should not pass judgement on soemthing i have never seen.
At least now there is a reason to see it,
still dont think i will though.
Cats? really?

This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper


I imagine that Eliot's estate approved. Cats was very popular and was well received by the theater critics. You can, of course, look it up, and read their reviews.

Cats (musical) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

 
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