Art defined

  1. Philosophy Forum
  2. » Aesthetics
  3. » Art defined

Get Email Updates Email this Topic Print this Page

Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 07:24 pm
I can liken the definition of art to the epiphenomenalist view of mind. The epiphenomenalist theory of mind says that mental states are emergent from brain states, but that those mental states exert no causal role on the physical brainstates from which they emerge. It can be said that mental states are like a shadow of brainstates.

I think what most people consider as "art" is like those shadows/mental states. The end product normally regarded as the art itself (a particular painting, film, musical piece, novel, etc. etc. etc.) is merely EMERGENT from the art, which exists purely in the moment of creation and can never exhibit temporal duration except as an emergent shadow (memory?) of the art, a mere reminder. It is in the moments of truly living in the present, of Dionysian intoxication in which reality is experienced unfiltered, that the most distinctive art is experienced and therefore great artworks produced. Art is an experience, not an end result.

Art is identitical to the present and is dead before it can ever be captured into a document that exhibits temporal duration. Art is life and life is art. The artworks that results is mere memory.
 
Phosphorous
 
Reply Wed 1 Apr, 2009 05:13 pm
@rhinogrey,
haha, All you needed to say was "Art is a reflection of life". If someone agrees, then the discussion is over. I don't think anyone who would disagree would deny that it's an important factor in determing art. For sure.
 
Ichthus91
 
Reply Wed 1 Apr, 2009 07:13 pm
@rhinogrey,
This is an interesting idea. However, from what I understand artwork is a visual representation of art in a printed publication, whereas; art is the products of human creativity. You can find the definitions I got here: WordNet Search - 3.0. A similar definition is found in Websters. It says that an artwork is material prepared for reproduction in printed matter. Looking at the definition of art according to Websters you see that art is basically a creative skill acquired by experience. So my question is; what is the case for art that cannot be "material prepared for reproduction in printed matter"? i.e. dancing.
 
Jose phil
 
Reply Thu 2 Apr, 2009 07:15 am
@rhinogrey,
"Art is a reflection of life."
 
Philly CS
 
Reply Mon 11 May, 2009 09:00 am
@rhinogrey,
Interesting view. So the paintings we see on the walls are just mere memories of art? That explains a lot, actually. However, these mere memories of art can sometimes elicit this inspiration from the viewers, so does that mean that the real art will even be more powerful as it is created, or does that mean that only the artist will be able to feel 'art'? Take an example of music here. Music, when performed on stage and at the moment, would be art, because it is at that moment of creation, the moment when the performer would be focused on the now, focused on the performance. Ah, I get what you mean now. Since art is the focus of now, the spontaneity within us, it is no different then, say, meditation. Hm.
 
 

 
  1. Philosophy Forum
  2. » Aesthetics
  3. » Art defined
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.02 seconds on 08/04/2020 at 04:49:19