Readings for Philosophy of Action?

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Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 12:25 am
I'm considering focussing my senior paper next spring on a topic/problem in philosophy of action. I'm not really familiar with this area and its literature at all, aside from a few philosophy of mind readings I've had. Any suggestions?
 
Zetherin
 
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 12:38 am
@Phronimos,
What do you mean "Philosophy of action" -- Causality, human psychology 'action', etc.?
 
Phronimos
 
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 01:57 am
@Phronimos,
Issues that arise with the study of action. What things cause actions (i.e. mental events, physical events, beliefs/desires, etc.)? The relationship between trying and acting. Intention & intentionality seems very related as well. At first glance, the causality question strikes me as the most interesting, but I don't want to put myself into a box before actually engaging with relevant readings.
 
Parapraxis
 
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 02:30 am
@Phronimos,
Free Will: A Very Short Introduction by Tom Pink.
 
Aedes
 
Reply Mon 16 Mar, 2009 07:20 am
@Phronimos,
Phronimos;53634 wrote:
The relationship between trying and acting. Intention & intentionality seems very related as well.
Look at some of this guy's references regarding intention.

The Experimental Philosophy Page
 
meditationyoga
 
Reply Fri 19 Jun, 2009 06:39 pm
@Phronimos,
Freidrich Nietzsche wrote about this a great deal. "Will" being greater than knowledge. As well schophenhaur. Read "Beyond Good and Evil."

---------- Post added at 05:42 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:39 PM ----------

Or "Thus Spake Zarathustra." This was "Nietzsche's" Superman.

Action brings alot of problem with it though. If someone is confused they will bring a great deal of chaos and disturbance with their action.

This is a great topic though. You can reach all the way back to Plato and Aristotle.
 
jgweed
 
Reply Sat 20 Jun, 2009 06:58 am
@Phronimos,
Some of the existentialists, particularly Sartre and Camus, extend their philosophical analysis into human action; Heidegger makes intentionality an important key to his early thinking, and Schultz and other "life philosophers" argue that a large part of reality is socially constructed.
All of these situational philosophies dwell on human action and generally avoid the problems raised by Cartesian dualism in its various disguises.
 
 

 
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