hebrew and christian timekeeping

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dan b
 
Reply Mon 4 Jan, 2010 01:37 am
7000 years after Adam............................................3000 AD

6000 years after Adam............................................2000 AD

5000 years after Adam............................................1000 AD

4000 years after Adam.......................JESUS CHRIST CRUCIFIED

3000 years after Adam............................................1000 BC

2000 years after Adam............................................2000 BC

1000 years after Adam............................................3000 BC

...Adam and Eve gardening in Mesopotamia.................4000 BC

The Bible tells us that for six days God laboured creating this world and then rested on the seventh. In this same pattern but over six thousand years our world has followed similarly until the present time when we have arrived at the seventh day.

The Hebrews and the Israelites have always begun their calendar from the time of Adam in Mesopotamia who is generally thought to have lived around 4000 BC. This would mean that their date would now be about 6000 years or more after Adam. With the culmination of this 6000 year period of world history, the Messiah is expected to arrive soon.

Christianity meanwhile, has set up it's own time-keeping calendar based on the same principle of a day equaling a thousand years. After Christ's crucifixion on Calvary Hill more than 2000 years ago, his followers the Christians began using their new calendar dating from his time in order to count the years until his return. The Bible tells us that Christ will rise again on the morning of the third day.

From the time of Christ, until the year 1000AD constituted the first day while from 1000AD until 2000AD would be the second day. The beginning of the 21st century is therefore the beginning of the third 1000 year period after Jesus Christ's crucifixion and is therefore the morning of the third day. In this way it appears that the Christians and the earlier Hebrews were both expectant of the coming Messiah at this same time.
 
KaseiJin
 
Reply Mon 4 Jan, 2010 06:53 am
@dan b,
This is not what the best evidence tells us. The early first century Christians were expecting the messiah, Yeshua, to return during their lifetime. It didn't happen because, obviously, it had not been a reality...no resurrection, no second-coming, no messiah, either.

Additionally, the creation story, though seemingly taken earlier on to be a literally story, is now known not to be, therefore to base expectations on that would prove useless.
 
Amperage
 
Reply Mon 4 Jan, 2010 12:04 pm
@dan b,
I still find this fascinating and I'm reminded of a man I used to know who claimed that we were in the 6th day now. Or the day of man as he called it. And that the 7th day is the same day talked about all throughout the New Testament as the day when Jesus returned, or the Great White Throne Judgment, or the End of Days, or whatever name you want to attach to it, it's all referring to the same day. I suppose from a certain view point it at least he was making some sense.
 
KaseiJin
 
Reply Mon 4 Jan, 2010 10:07 pm
@Amperage,
Amperage;116939 wrote:
I suppose from a certain view point it at least he was making some sense.


It's just that the base upon which his viewpoint had most obviously stood, had been a misunderstanding--thus in error. And of course, if the premise is in error, any conclusion reached will reflect that error, thus be in error itself (in by far most cases, if not all).
 
Amperage
 
Reply Mon 4 Jan, 2010 10:08 pm
@KaseiJin,
KaseiJin;117139 wrote:
It's just that the base upon which his viewpoint had most obviously stood, had been a misunderstanding--thus in error. And of course, if the premise is in error, any conclusion reached will reflect that error, thus be in error itself (in by far most cases, if not all).
that's true too.
 
Aedes
 
Reply Mon 4 Jan, 2010 10:17 pm
@dan b,
It's not entirely true that "Christianity" believes in this 6000 year thing. It's been only sporadically mentioned until the last 100-200 years, and in fact it was a 19th century project to figure out how old the world was based on biblical references. I do recall that Shakespeare mentions the world being ~ 6000 years old, forget which play (I've read all 38 of them), but you'd be hard pressed to demonstrate that this specific age has been the consensus within either religion.
 
dan b
 
Reply Mon 4 Jan, 2010 11:07 pm
@Aedes,
Arn't you at all amazed at how the Hebrew's system and the newer Christian time-keeping system coincide? Think about how the Hebrews counted the years form Adam in Mesopotamia about 4000BC, and then somehow the Chritians made up their calendar to count 2000 years from Jesus and it came out to the same year! Thats the amazing mystery to me. Who had the power and vision to do this yet 2000 years ago? dan b
 
KaseiJin
 
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 02:13 am
@dan b,
dan b;117159 wrote:
Arn't you at all amazed at how the Hebrew's system and the newer Christian time-keeping system coincide? Think about how the Hebrews counted the years form Adam in Mesopotamia about 4000BC, and then somehow the Chritians made up their calendar to count 2000 years from Jesus and it came out to the same year! Thats the amazing mystery to me. Who had the power and vision to do this yet 2000 years ago? dan b


When was the present Gregorian calendar created? What is the Jewish year, this year (from that starting point...which is in the Fall? was it? Aedes? can you help me out here some?)

Let's see, the Ice Man was dated to have lived some 7,000 years ago, if my memory serves me well, that'd be about 5,000 BCE. There are some digs in Turkey which are rather fairly put around 5,000 BCE. Are you sure you have your numbers right, dan b?
 
Aedes
 
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 11:58 am
@KaseiJin,
KaseiJin;117187 wrote:
Let's see, the Ice Man was dated to have lived some 7,000 years ago, if my memory serves me well, that'd be about 5,000 BCE. There are some digs in Turkey which are rather fairly put around 5,000 BCE. Are you sure you have your numbers right, dan b?


These cave paintings from Chauvet Cave in southern France are around 32,000 years old and depict some animals that have been extinct in human history.

Chauvet Cave - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


dan b;117159 wrote:
Arn't you at all amazed at how the Hebrew's system and the newer Christian time-keeping system coincide?
Considering there is direct geographic, cultural, and scriptural continuity between the two, I find that a bit less than amazing. I'd be more shocked if there was correspondance between the ancient Hebrews and the ancient Meso-Americans.
 
dan b
 
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 12:50 pm
@Aedes,
The year of 4000BC in Mesopotamia is generally considered by historians to be the "big bang" explosion beginning mankind's development of civilization. From this time over a period of 6000 years we went from nomadic cave-men type people until our supernatual modern would of today. That is why the Hebrew-Christian time-keeping chart is so amazing. The Bible, although written at least 3000 years ago describes this.

Gen.4.22 - Mankind uses metal.

Gen 3;23 - Mankind to till the ground.

Gen 2;20 - Adam names the animals.

Gen. 2;8 - Put man in garden.

Jn.1 - Beginning was the word(language)

Gen. 2;7 Breath of life(language)

Gen. 1;27 Humans Created

It is evident to see that the first few chapters of Genesis are describing the beginning of civilization in Mesopotamia around 4000BC. We now know these facts to be true from archeological evidence that has been gathered and analysed. This was done only in the last two hundred years during the 19th and 20th centuries. But how did the ancient bible writer know these things? Primitive people could't know what was happining all over the rest of the world.
After all the Bible was first compiled about 500BC although the book of Genesis is said to be much older. It is amazing that someone could realize and write the now credible facts! That civilization began in Mesopotamia in the forms of language, writing, large scale agriculture, discovery of metal and more, is the statement that is described in the second Genesis Creation Story of chapter two. These innovations first originated here, and then only after numerous millennium spread throughtout the rest of the world. Europeans were still barbarians when it arrived via Rome.
 
Aedes
 
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 02:43 pm
@dan b,
Ok, but what about those 32,000 year old cave paintings?

Or had the carbon-14 already gone through a few half-lives by the time of Creation?
 
dan b
 
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 10:05 pm
@Aedes,
What about it?.....
 
Aedes
 
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2010 10:10 pm
@dan b,
Anything, for starters!
 
dan b
 
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2010 10:13 pm
@Aedes,
Many things may have happened over the last million years or so. But the beginning of our Modern innovative world that we have today is said to have really gotten going about 4000BC in Mesopotamia. Thats why Hebrew and Christian time-keeping start there.
 
KaseiJin
 
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2010 08:37 am
@dan b,
I'm afraid your interpretation cannot hold up at all. Additionally, it might be good to do some more research on biblical history as well. Genesis has a couple of hands in it, and was somewhat likely 're-compiled' after the exile to Babylon (which is a historical fact much more secure than the assertion that Genesis (as we have it today) had been re-compiled earlier than around 200 BCE)
 
octobrist
 
Reply Sun 28 Feb, 2010 01:05 am
@KaseiJin,
KaseiJin;116864 wrote:
Additionally, the creation story, though seemingly taken earlier on to be a literally story, is now known not to be, therefore to base expectations on that would prove useless.

Actually, the creation story is polemical in nature; recent evidence over the past 100 years suggest the creation story to have been the Jews antithesis to their Babylonian detainers. Literal interpretation is largely a Westernized form of thinking, and the establishment of the evolution theory confused a society that was previously unaware of the true nature of the opening chapter of Genesis.
When theistic evolutionists claim that Genesis 1&2 are "allegorical" and "figurative", they have a point.
 
 

 
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