Homemade Ice Cream

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wayne
 
Reply Mon 17 May, 2010 10:42 pm
As I sat, last evening, eating a bowl of store bought vanilla ice cream with herschey's syrup, I was reminded of the ice cream we children made in the garage, with my father, on summer evenings of my youth.

Herschey's syrup came in a can then, not a plastic bottle, and we had a nut grinder filled with walnuts.
We always had an old handcranked freezer, that we children took turns cranking until the ice cream was stiff.
My father eschewed the new electric freezers, he said it spoiled the whole experience.

Are there any of us left out there?
Will the next generation live their entire lives without tasting ice cream hand cranked in their own driveway?

Does every new technology cost us something equally valuable?

Are we doomed to spend our lives eating store bought ice cream? Ugh!

I wonder if the antique shop has an old hand crank freezer I can buy?
 
Jebediah
 
Reply Mon 17 May, 2010 11:30 pm
@wayne,
Probably there is something your grandparents could describe in the same way, that you just buy in the store. But you have a choice between buying it conveniently, and making it the old way. Best of both.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Mon 17 May, 2010 11:33 pm
@Jebediah,
Jebediah;165567 wrote:
Probably there is something your grandparents could describe in the same way, that you just buy in the store. But you have a choice between buying it conveniently, and making it the old way. Best of both.


And, anyway, I don't remember homemade ice-cream being better than store-bought. On the contrary. But, of course, that is why I am never impressed when a restaurant is praised for serving home-made food. I know some homes....well, never mind.
 
Jebediah
 
Reply Mon 17 May, 2010 11:42 pm
@wayne,
Yes, I expect the best ice cream is made in a factory type setting. I wouldn't expect homemade food to be better than gourmet food. Some store bought food is processed and made cheaply, and so people assume that store bought food is of poor quality when really it is cheap food that is poor quality. Although that isn't always true. But cheapness or lack of freshness is why some store bought foods are inferior.
 
wayne
 
Reply Mon 17 May, 2010 11:43 pm
@Jebediah,
Jebediah;165567 wrote:
Probably there is something your grandparents could describe in the same way, that you just buy in the store. But you have a choice between buying it conveniently, and making it the old way. Best of both.


Yes, the choice is our own, to make or not to make.
Is convenience robbing us of our responsibility?
Does it really matter that my children don't have that memory,or have I allowed convenience to cause me to fail in my responsibility?

---------- Post added 05-18-2010 at 12:46 AM ----------

kennethamy;165572 wrote:
And, anyway, I don't remember homemade ice-cream being better than store-bought. On the contrary. But, of course, that is why I am never impressed when a restaurant is praised for serving home-made food. I know some homes....well, never mind.


I don't think it mattered which was really better, that is relative to the experience anyway. I remember pbj sandwiches tasting like heaven on the last day of a canoe trip, when food supplies were low.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Mon 17 May, 2010 11:53 pm
@wayne,
wayne;165580 wrote:
Yes, the choice is our own, to make or not to make.
Is convenience robbing us of our responsibility?
Does it really matter that my children don't have that memory,or have I allowed convenience to cause me to fail in my responsibility?

---------- Post added 05-18-2010 at 12:46 AM ----------



I don't think it mattered which was really better, that is relative to the experience anyway. I remember pbj sandwiches tasting like heaven on the last day of a canoe trip, when food supplies were low.


Yes, there is the German saying, "Hunger is der beste koch". (Hunger is the best cook).
 
Khethil
 
Reply Tue 18 May, 2010 07:27 am
@wayne,
What a good story - thanks.

wayne;165549 wrote:
Does every new technology cost us something equally valuable?


Yes it does. Every change to the way we live our lives - large and small - has its repercussions. Some are dire while others barely warrant mention. But I believe humanity has a bad, bad habit of not seeing the whole picture when it comes to making changes towards convenience. To the extent that this is true, it speaks towards what has been both a boon and a bane: The draw we feel towards achieving immediate goals.

I used to grind ice cream too; in my case, at my grandmother's house. We did it on hot, muggy afternoons and I swear I always got the longest shift and the sorest arms. Like was already mentioned, this never tasted as good to the tongue as the stuff one can buy in the store that takes no immediate effort, is relatively cheap and convenient. But the whole experience was much more satisfying on grandma's porch. This isn't whimsical melancholy, there's a solid basis for this.

In our minds (and in this case) we want "Ice Cream". Logical suggests that - as Jeb pointed out - one can choose which he or she wants. But we are creatures of expedience, and when our apparent goal is "Ice Cream", why would anyone choose an inferior product brought at great effort?

We lose something vital in our humanity when these goals become so easy that they require no investment of our time and energies. Through this, we value them less, work less, exercise our bodies less and get fatter through the good stuff because they're so accessible. Now, I'll be the first one to tell you that I *love* ice cream and I buy mine at the store - but truth be told, almost anyone would. The payoff -vs- the goal we're seeking is almost absurd in its disparity. The point: Its too alluring and too seductive to go the easy way.

Take cars: Who'd deny that the freedom, independence and benefits they provide is simply fantastic? Yet, did we stop to think about the fatalities, impaired driving hazard, pollution (and its resultant oil glut and the conflicts/fatalities that causes), decreased exercise or community impact, urban sprawl or any of the other thousand diminutive factors that came with it? And yes, I too have a car despite how I feel; the reason: Its too alluring not to have one.

I don't demonize all technology, but I think it wise that - as philosophers - we look at the whole picture; what's lost as well as what's gained. And this I'll say with complete confidence: When our lives become a litany of conveniences had with little to no effort, the meaning and satisfaction of those lives is diminished since the immediate/obvious goal becomes void of individual investment.

Good point - thanks
 
xris
 
Reply Tue 18 May, 2010 07:44 am
@Khethil,
I feel I should tell you my simple recipe. Frozen fruits of your choice with sugar and double cream in a processor...Simple and easy, not very philosophical but very practical.
 
Lily
 
Reply Tue 18 May, 2010 08:46 am
@wayne,
home made ice cream is the best. At least if you know what you're doing, and have a ice cream maker. I love ice cream, and I make ice cream quite often, at least in the summer. I love cooking, but there's just something special about making ice cream. It's not that difficult, but you just can't buy ice cream that good.
 
fast
 
Reply Tue 18 May, 2010 08:56 am
@kennethamy,
[QUOTE=kennethamy;165572]And, anyway, I don't remember homemade ice-cream being better than store-bought. On the contrary. But, of course, that is why I am never impressed when a restaurant is praised for serving home-made food. I know some homes....well, never mind.[/QUOTE]

Bah Humbug! That's not the right attitude. You're supposed to remember it being better than store-bought -- even if it wasn't as tasty. This is an example of one of those times when you're expected to twist things so they sound nice and pleasing to the ears of others. Yes, it may not taste better (just keep that too yourself!), but the mere fact it was done at home and with loved ones is what can be construed as what makes it better -- hence, you can honestly convey that it's better so long as you manage to find a way to construe the circumstances in a way that you can remember it being better.

No, you're not supposed to follow the thinking of the crowd and believe that something is better just because others say it is; we do our own thinking! But, you are supposed to pretend that it's better for the sake of the crowd until you can come up with a way to twist how things actually were, and you're supposed to keep pretending that until you find a way to construe them in a more favorable light.

The young and less sophisticated among us are the ones that boast and profess that they do not care what others think of them, and though the older and more sophisticated may even care less, they should at least know better than conveying how they feel when among a crowd that does follow the crowd.

Those who say there is no Santa shouldn't be surprised when the presents they receive grow thin.

---------- Post added 05-18-2010 at 10:58 AM ----------

[QUOTE=Lily;165741]home made ice cream is the best. At least if you know what you're doing, and have a ice cream maker. I love ice cream, and I make ice cream quite often, at least in the summer. I love cooking, but there's just something special about making ice cream. It's not that difficult, but you just can't buy ice cream that good.[/QUOTE]
And always add just a smidgen more vanilla extract than you should. Not too much more, but just a little more. To die for!
 
Ergo phil
 
Reply Tue 18 May, 2010 10:18 am
@wayne,
Coke-flavored home-made ice cream.

Try this out Lily and let me know how it turns out.
 
wayne
 
Reply Tue 18 May, 2010 09:09 pm
@Khethil,
Khethil;165708 wrote:
What a good story - thanks.



Yes it does. Every change to the way we live our lives - large and small - has its repercussions. Some are dire while others barely warrant mention. But I believe humanity has a bad, bad habit of not seeing the whole picture when it comes to making changes towards convenience. To the extent that this is true, it speaks towards what has been both a boon and a bane: The draw we feel towards achieving immediate goals.

I used to grind ice cream too; in my case, at my grandmother's house. We did it on hot, muggy afternoons and I swear I always got the longest shift and the sorest arms. Like was already mentioned, this never tasted as good to the tongue as the stuff one can buy in the store that takes no immediate effort, is relatively cheap and convenient. But the whole experience was much more satisfying on grandma's porch. This isn't whimsical melancholy, there's a solid basis for this.

In our minds (and in this case) we want "Ice Cream". Logical suggests that - as Jeb pointed out - one can choose which he or she wants. But we are creatures of expedience, and when our apparent goal is "Ice Cream", why would anyone choose an inferior product brought at great effort?

We lose something vital in our humanity when these goals become so easy that they require no investment of our time and energies. Through this, we value them less, work less, exercise our bodies less and get fatter through the good stuff because they're so accessible. Now, I'll be the first one to tell you that I *love* ice cream and I buy mine at the store - but truth be told, almost anyone would. The payoff -vs- the goal we're seeking is almost absurd in its disparity. The point: Its too alluring and too seductive to go the easy way.

Take cars: Who'd deny that the freedom, independence and benefits they provide is simply fantastic? Yet, did we stop to think about the fatalities, impaired driving hazard, pollution (and its resultant oil glut and the conflicts/fatalities that causes), decreased exercise or community impact, urban sprawl or any of the other thousand diminutive factors that came with it? And yes, I too have a car despite how I feel; the reason: Its too alluring not to have one.

I don't demonize all technology, but I think it wise that - as philosophers - we look at the whole picture; what's lost as well as what's gained. And this I'll say with complete confidence: When our lives become a litany of conveniences had with little to no effort, the meaning and satisfaction of those lives is diminished since the immediate/obvious goal becomes void of individual investment.

Good point - thanks


What an excellent response.
I am of the same mind on this subject. I will never be able to give up those conveniences willingly, but I hope to recognize the value of earning a few things the hard way.

As a fisherman, I practice this regularly. There are many easier, and more productive, ways to catch a Trout than with a fly rod. Any fly fisherman will tell you that isn't the point. I like to fish rivers, on foot, precisely because it is difficult.

My Father often spoke of moderation, something I see too little of today.
 
Khethil
 
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 10:17 am
@wayne,
Wayne,

Thank you and agree completely

wayne;165938 wrote:
As a fisherman, I practice this regularly. There are many easier, and more productive, ways to catch a Trout than with a fly rod. Any fly fisherman will tell you that isn't the point. I like to fish rivers, on foot, precisely because it is difficult.


Another great example. I believe in this subject lies a truth that is, by the day, becoming more important as humans continue to seek 'happiness' while simultaneously grabbing onto conveniences that ultimately make them quite the opposite. I believe that general feelings of well being, in our species, arise only when we do work and toil and then feel the thinnest slice of goal-gratification. But when we skip over the 'toil' in lieu of instant (or non-'earned') gratification, we lose the inner satisfaction that is hard to foresee.

This method of satisfaction-through-working is a human trait that is contrary to conveniences; and as our means of effortless entertainment and satisfaction become more numerous, we'll continue to "go for the quick"; and in so doing, become less satisfied and less content.

I'm not sure where this is heading... perhaps we'll adjust somehow. It is a cause for concern though since profit-making in the business world combined with advertising all play off our desire for expediency towards these paper-tigers of happiness - creating a snowball effect of destructive behavior.

It'll be interesting to see though... for whatever time I've got left.

Thanks
 
Jebediah
 
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 12:24 pm
@Khethil,
Khethil;166153 wrote:

Another great example. I believe in this subject lies a truth that is, by the day, becoming more important as humans continue to seek 'happiness' while simultaneously grabbing onto conveniences that ultimately make them quite the opposite. I believe that general feelings of well being, in our species, arise only when we do work and toil and then feel the thinnest slice of goal-gratification. But when we skip over the 'toil' in lieu of instant (or non-'earned') gratification, we lose the inner satisfaction that is hard to foresee.


We can certainly see the pitfalls of this approach in things like "how I lost 40 pounds in two weeks without dieting!". Going for a quick fix often does not solve the problem at all.

But I think you are applying this idea too broadly. There are things that give us satisfaction for having worked at them, and there are things that don't. These are different for different people and change over time. I would not have more feelings of well being if I walked to the grocery store and back than if I drove. If I thought it was better to walk, and that walking made me better, then maybe I would feel better.

Why should we feel better for having worked at something? Since it seems to depend on our beliefs. Wouldn't it be better to work at things which require work, and take the quick method when that works well?
 
Khethil
 
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 12:52 pm
@Jebediah,
Hey Jeb,

Jebediah;166163 wrote:
I would not have more feelings of well being if I walked to the grocery store and back than if I drove.


I think you would, quite a bit. It's not an immediate, high-impact feeling of euphoria, but forgetting for a moment that the goal is "food", you'd exercise yourself, perhaps talk to folks, see what's going on, get some time to think, enjoy just being outside and much, much more. Then, when you got your food, the whole process would feel just a wee bit more satisfying in an overall fashion having gotten out of your house and into the fresh air with a slightly more lively body and an overall experience that says "Living" rather than just "Hurry up and Get".

But... even though I really believe this, I'm not sure it much matters. Take me, for example, my wife and I purposefully go out walking each day, but I'm hypocritical in that I drive to the store. The reason: Its simply too convenient.. and we're back to the main point.

Jebediah;166163 wrote:
Why should we feel better for having worked at something?


I'm not sure there's a "should" here. I believe that inner feeling of accomplishment adds to the satisfaction of overall meeting that goal. When we see just the goal, only the goal and no correlary benefits or drawbacks, then the expedient becomes our only focus and on go the horse blinders to other aspects.

Jebediah;166163 wrote:
Wouldn't it be better to work at things which require work, and take the quick method when that works well?


Absolutely. Unfortunately, no human (in our society with the means) can make that decision consistently and wisely without being overwhelmed with the extreme practicality of simply "getting" what we think we need or want. Its simply too alluring; making far too much sense to our goal-oriented natures to not do it the easy way.

Thanks for asking, I hope this helps understanding.
 
Jebediah
 
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 01:11 pm
@Khethil,
Khethil;166167 wrote:
Hey Jeb,

I think you would, quite a bit. It's not an immediate, high-impact feeling of euphoria, but forgetting for a moment that the goal is "food", you'd exercise yourself, perhaps talk to folks, see what's going on, get some time to think, enjoy just being outside and much, much more. Then, when you got your food, the whole process would feel just a wee bit more satisfying in an overall fashion having gotten out of your house and into the fresh air with a slightly more lively body and an overall experience that says "Living" rather than just "Hurry up and Get".

But... even though I really believe this, I'm not sure it much matters. Take me, for example, my wife and I purposefully go out walking each day, but I'm hypocritical in that I drive to the store. The reason: Its simply too convenient.. and we're back to the main point.


But I picked that example for a reason. One year in college I walked to the grocery store for food because I didn't have a car. Not more than I mile I think, but it was not more satisfying than driving. In particular I found that carrying the bags made my upper back sore by the time I was home. And that makes a contrast with exercising deliberately--where the soreness is satisfying, because it seems to me that I am working at something worthwhile. Walking to get groceries does not seem to me to be worthwhile. If it did seem that way to someone, they would probably find it satisfying.


Quote:

I'm not sure there's a "should" here. I believe that inner feeling of accomplishment adds to the satisfaction of overall meeting that goal. When we see just the goal, only the goal and no correlary benefits or drawbacks, then the expedient becomes our only focus and on go the horse blinders to other aspects.


I'm supposing that there isn't an inherent inner feeling of accomplishment, that's when it becomes a question of "should".


Quote:
Absolutely. Unfortunately, no human (in our society with the means) can make that decision consistently and wisely without being overwhelmed with the extreme practicality of simply "getting" what we think we need or want. Its simply too alluring; making far too much sense to our goal-oriented natures to not do it the easy way.

Thanks for asking, I hope this helps understanding.


I think we can learn which things require work--the alternative of just working hard on the assumption that it's better doesn't seem very good.
 
Khethil
 
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 02:29 pm
@Jebediah,
Hola,

Jebediah;166171 wrote:
But I picked that example for a reason. One year in college I walked to the grocery store for food because I didn't have a car. Not more than I mile I think, but it was not more satisfying than driving. In particular I found that carrying the bags made my upper back sore by the time I was home. And that makes a contrast with exercising deliberately--where the soreness is satisfying, because it seems to me that I am working at something worthwhile. Walking to get groceries does not seem to me to be worthwhile. If it did seem that way to someone, they would probably find it satisfying.


I understand, and I think those are valid concerns. But I fear the perspective of what I'm trying communicate isn't coming through. Of course it doesn't seem worthwhile to you (or to me, since it appears we're in similiar situations) because we've grown up in a setting where such isn't necessary. All the benefits I spoke about earlier aren't even on our radars - it just doesn't seem worth it. But, as I mentioned, the point of the exercise (to me) is to recognize the loss as well as the gain in this environment.

No, I'm not saying that you consciously enjoyed it in the setting it took place, but that's only because you carry the conscious knowledge that you don't have to work for it - and its hard to deny that there is loss on many levels. In any case, as I said earlier, this is an egg we can't unscramble.

Jebediah;166163 wrote:
I'm supposing that there isn't an inherent inner feeling of accomplishment, that's when it becomes a question of "should".


I hear ya - I've not yet focused my examination on that aspect of it since I'm (personally) still trying to work through what the effects and variables are, its relevance and impact, etc.

Jebediah;166163 wrote:
I think we can learn which things require work--the alternative of just working hard on the assumption that it's better doesn't seem very good.


Its not an assumption, nor am I suggesting we do such a thing.

For now, it's an idea; an examination of the way things are in terms of human nature and how we live our daily lives. The pluses and minuses of convenience and expedience.

  • I think it self evident that the more effort you put into something, to a point, the more the goal (once satisfied) has value.


  • It should also be apparent that simply because an exercise is easy doesn't mean it is therefore better


  • Goal-oriented behavior is a two-sided coin: I believe its been one of the vehicles for some of the best survivability in the human. But when we look to immediate goals only, some of the collateral benefits are lost. Is it worth it? That all depends...


  • Work for work's sake is silly; Again, not saying that. But there are other benefits that go behind a higher value for that sack of groceries. Its wise we acknowledge this

In any case, I'm not saying you should walk - that's obviously up to you. But you must admit; the process becomes different and those other parts of *living* that you've skipped over by zoomin in your car are now absent. Whether or not its worth it to "go the hard way" is up to each individual for themselves. I only hope to spread the word that the question should be asked and pondered by the thoughtful.

Thanks
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 02:36 pm
@Ergo phil,
Ergo;165772 wrote:
Coke-flavored home-made ice cream.

Try this out Lily and let me know how it turns out.


I like it flavored with spaghetti sauce. Scrumptious, and very comforting on a cold night.
 
Jebediah
 
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 10:25 pm
@Khethil,
Khethil;166180 wrote:
Hola,

I understand, and I think those are valid concerns. But I fear the perspective of what I'm trying communicate isn't coming through. Of course it doesn't seem worthwhile to you (or to me, since it appears we're in similiar situations) because we've grown up in a setting where such isn't necessary. All the benefits I spoke about earlier aren't even on our radars - it just doesn't seem worth it. But, as I mentioned, the point of the exercise (to me) is to recognize the loss as well as the gain in this environment.

No, I'm not saying that you consciously enjoyed it in the setting it took place, but that's only because you carry the conscious knowledge that you don't have to work for it - and its hard to deny that there is loss on many levels. In any case, as I said earlier, this is an egg we can't unscramble.


That hasn't been my experience. There are things that I have done the hard way because I had no knowledge of the easier way or it hadn't been invented yet. The experiences were not especially enjoyable and the more convenient and faster ways were more enjoyable. Having a cell phone compared to not having one for example.

But maybe I'm taking the wrong tack with this. Getting something done that you are supposed to get done brings a certain satisfaction. If I had a responsibility that I had to undertake every day that took an hour and required work, then each day I would get the satisfaction from working to complete it. The more convenient it becomes the more I lose that. BUT, I am only losing out on that particular tasks satisfaction. In the time saved I can read part of a book. Some people don't, and end up feeling like they have done nothing with their day. I've been there myself, but I would take the freedom any day.

It is certainly something to be aware of. Convenient technology is a good thing, but it does leave a gap to be filled.
 
HexHammer
 
Reply Fri 21 May, 2010 03:55 am
@wayne,
wayne;165549 wrote:
As I sat, last evening, eating a bowl of store bought vanilla ice cream with herschey's syrup, I was reminded of the ice cream we children made in the garage, with my father, on summer evenings of my youth.

Herschey's syrup came in a can then, not a plastic bottle, and we had a nut grinder filled with walnuts.
We always had an old handcranked freezer, that we children took turns cranking until the ice cream was stiff.
My father eschewed the new electric freezers, he said it spoiled the whole experience.

Are there any of us left out there?
Will the next generation live their entire lives without tasting ice cream hand cranked in their own driveway?

Does every new technology cost us something equally valuable?

Are we doomed to spend our lives eating store bought ice cream? Ugh!

I wonder if the antique shop has an old hand crank freezer I can buy?
AAAARRR!!! ...OOOOHHH!!! OMGOMG!! :brickwall: ..this is torture!! ..this is not fair!!! Mouthwatering!! ..must not give in!! ..must not!! :a-thought:
 
 

 
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