Freud`s Theory of Justice

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show me
 
Reply Thu 1 Apr, 2010 12:52 am
I`m writing an essay on him with reference to Locke, and I was wondering if anyone could help me focus on the main parts of his argument.

Please and Thank you :bigsmile:

---------- Post added 04-01-2010 at 03:09 AM ----------

Or if anyone can link me to a good website? That would be amazing.
 
jeeprs
 
Reply Thu 1 Apr, 2010 05:57 am
@show me,
well a good start would be to name your thread after Locke, instead of Freud.

Maybe it was a Lockian slip.

anyway go and look at Early Modern Texts - Philosophers and Philosophy Topics. It has Locke's writings in updated English.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Thu 1 Apr, 2010 06:03 am
@show me,
show me;146992 wrote:
I`m writing an essay on him with reference to Locke, and I was wondering if anyone could help me focus on the main parts of his argument.

Please and Thank you :bigsmile:

---------- Post added 04-01-2010 at 03:09 AM ----------

Or if anyone can link me to a good website? That would be amazing.


Justice as natural law

Main article: Natural law
For advocates of the theory that justice is part of natural law (e.g., John Locke), it involves the system of consequences which naturally derives from any action or choice. In this, it is similar to the laws of physics: in the same way as the Third of Newton's laws of Motion requires that for every action there must be an equal and opposite reaction, justice requires according individuals or groups what they actually deserve, merit, or are entitled to. Justice, on this account, is a universal and absolute concept: laws, principles, religions, etc., are merely attempts to codify that concept, sometimes with results that entirely contradict the true nature of justice.

From Wikipedia
 
show me
 
Reply Thu 1 Apr, 2010 07:06 am
@kennethamy,
No i meant Freud, and in my essay I need to reference Locke.

In Freud's work Civilization and it's Discontents

I need to focus on Freud's arguments for social justice and compare it to Locke.

I'm quite familiar with Locke
 
Fido
 
Reply Thu 1 Apr, 2010 12:06 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;147032 wrote:
Justice as natural law

Main article: Natural law
For advocates of the theory that justice is part of natural law (e.g., John Locke), it involves the system of consequences which naturally derives from any action or choice. In this, it is similar to the laws of physics: in the same way as the Third of Newton's laws of Motion requires that for every action there must be an equal and opposite reaction, justice requires according individuals or groups what they actually deserve, merit, or are entitled to. Justice, on this account, is a universal and absolute concept: laws, principles, religions, etc., are merely attempts to codify that concept, sometimes with results that entirely contradict the true nature of justice.

From Wikipedia


Locke did not get natural law any better than yourself...Natural law comes from the Roman Law of Nations which is the first place, and perhaps accidentally, where an equality between nations of people is advanced, and from that humble start, and from St. Paul, the notion of indiviual equality was born...Our word nature, and all its variations comes from Natal, from the Navel, our connection to our whole community through a common mother...
 
HexHammer
 
Reply Tue 13 Apr, 2010 08:40 pm
@show me,
Hmmm, puzzeling many of those asking for help, displays pictures of beautiful women. Question is, is it an imposter who tries to raise chances for help, or are they actual beautiful women?

Just that playing various online games over the years, I'v met endless girl-imposers, displaying whole photoseries of their life ..etc. Usually my suspecion rises when they play too well, and I don't know them already by another nickname ...not that I'v played games obsessivly ..COUGH COUGH!!!
 
 

 
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