Is English more than one language

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HexHammer
 
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2010 09:33 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;142199 wrote:
I don't think that is true. Neither German nor the Scandinavian languages do. But all European languages do come out of the Indo-European family of languages (except for Basque, or Hungarian or, Finnish. I believe that Finnish and Hungarian are related, however). All the Romance languages do share a Latin lineage, however.
Allow me to correct myself, some does.

And scandinavian languages does, I'm danish myself, though Islandic and finnish doesn't.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2010 09:38 am
@HexHammer,
HexHammer;142201 wrote:
Allow me to correct myself, some does.

And scandinavian languages does, I'm danish myself, though Islandic and finnish doesn't.


I still don't think that Danish (for example) has Latin roots. Neither does Hungarian. Neither does Basque. I still think you mean, Indo-European, which, itself, comes out of Sanskrit. Of course, we cannot just speculate. It is a question of fact, not of opinion. It needs to be looked up.

By the way, Basque is called (by linguists) an "isolate" because it is connected to no other languages. Fino-Hungarian is an isolate group in Europe. In Asia, Korean and Japanese are isolates.
 
HexHammer
 
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2010 10:26 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;142203 wrote:
I still don't think that Danish (for example) has Latin roots. Neither does Hungarian. Neither does Basque. I still think you mean, Indo-European, which, itself, comes out of Sanskrit. Of course, we cannot just speculate. It is a question of fact, not of opinion. It needs to be looked up.

By the way, Basque is called (by linguists) an "isolate" because it is connected to no other languages. Fino-Hungarian is an isolate group in Europe. In Asia, Korean and Japanese are isolates.
I'm quite sure it does.

The Goths (germans) was in the end of Roman Empire the henchmen, since romans grew decadent and didn't wanna do the dirtywork themselfs. Even a huge crowd of Goths was allowed to immigrate to an area north east of Italy, and thereby the Goths evolved their language based on latin.

It's a fact that old danish are heavily influenced by german language. Also danes would tour most of europe by year 800+ and let our language evolve by that.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2010 11:08 am
@HexHammer,
HexHammer;142211 wrote:
I'm quite sure it does.

The Goths (germans) was in the end of Roman Empire the henchmen, since romans grew decadent and didn't wanna do the dirtywork themselfs. Even a huge crowd of Goths was allowed to immigrate to an area north east of Italy, and thereby the Goths evolved their language based on latin.

It's a fact that old danish are heavily influenced by german language. Also danes would tour most of europe by year 800+ and let our language evolve by that.


According to my best knowledge, the Romance languages are derived from Latin. The Scandinavian languages are not. Both the Romance and the Scandinavian languages are derived from Indo-European, which is, in turn, derived from Sanskrit.
 
HexHammer
 
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2010 11:34 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;142218 wrote:
According to my best knowledge, the Romance languages are derived from Latin. The Scandinavian languages are not. Both the Romance and the Scandinavian languages are derived from Indo-European, which is, in turn, derived from Sanskrit.
Today's scandinavian tounges (save Finnish) does not resemble 800 AD's language at all.
 
Pepijn Sweep
 
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2010 12:49 pm
@wayne,
wayne;141613 wrote:
I find it interesting that in speaking english, we often seem to be speaking many languges. Some persons are multi-lingual and are able to understand and speak in many different forms. Are these dialects? Entire languages?
The regional dialects aside, we often have difficulty understanding one another.
I really don't know anything about latin, but my impression is of a language more direct, less equivocal.

This is WIDE open to communication as a whole


Hi ! That's pretty international English. As a Dutchspeaking European I find it harder and harder to understand English. Modern variations I mean. I can not understand modern rap to name a thing.

At home we speak a mix of English, Dutch and Spanish. Latin if we need too. Normally with family we speak a Frisian "dialect", unless are US one-lingual aunties present. In the neigbourhood I donnot use difficult words.

Languages tell so much about a people. Tribes US would call it. The Franks, the Belges, Angels, Saxons etc. All with accounts, ancestery, rituals and religions. Traces of these Old Languages are preserved in Names.

Groet Pepijn Sweep:OK:
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2010 01:07 pm
@HexHammer,
HexHammer;142223 wrote:
Today's scandinavian tounges (save Finnish) does not resemble 800 AD's language at all.


What has that to do with it?
 
Pepijn Sweep
 
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2010 01:50 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;1422[SIZE=85 wrote:
44]What has that to do with it?

[/COLOR][/SIZE] [CENTER]
Dear Mr. Kennethamy,
:bigsmile:
It means people have difficulties Old Text. There will not be many English able to read the Magna Charta, Bill of Rights or St James'Bible.

I do not Imagion the situation is very better in the United States. Now we still talking one language. Biblia & Al-Quoran are both collections of many times translated documents, often conflicting. They claim Divine Law to be; fact is they are copies of copies.

In Europe we start to learn from our Older languages because they are from local Origin, adapted to the needs of birthe population. A second (imperial) language was handy for trade and diplomacy.

Even though we call it German and Dutch, we are one group. I once read about a Danish King dividing his Country. Jutland was for his Oldest son, Flanders and Holland to the yonger sons. So we call ourselves also Frisians, with a official language.

Language is important by thinking. It is abstract and might catch the meaning of a proverbial Butterfly. I hope not to bore you,

Pepijn Sweep's O:Glasses:

[/CENTER]

---------- Post added 03-22-2010 at 12:53 PM ----------

HexHammer;142223 wrote:
Today's scandinavian tounges (save Finnish) does not resemble 800 AD's language at all.


But BeoWulf is more easy to read for US then for most British.Laughing
 
wayne
 
Reply Mon 22 Mar, 2010 02:57 pm
@Pepijn Sweep,
Pepijn Sweep;142236 wrote:

Hi ! That's pretty international English. As a Dutchspeaking European I find it harder and harder to understand English. Modern variations I mean. I can not understand modern rap to name a thing.

At home we speak a mix of English, Dutch and Spanish. Latin if we need too. Normally with family we speak a Frisian "dialect", unless are US one-lingual aunties present. In the neigbourhood I donnot use difficult words.

Languages tell so much about a people. Tribes US would call it. The Franks, the Belges, Angels, Saxons etc. All with accounts, ancestery, rituals and religions. Traces of these Old Languages are preserved in Names.

Groet Pepijn Sweep


I think context is the hardest part for us to learn ,when a language differs from our own. I have fascination for Afrikaans, both the context and the origin. It is so very different than my own language.
 
Pepijn Sweep
 
Reply Thu 15 Apr, 2010 08:42 am
@wayne,
wayne;142288 wrote:
I think context is the hardest part for us to learn ,when a language differs from our own. I have fascination for Afrikaans, both the context and the origin. It is so very different than my own language.

[CENTER]:bigsmile:
I got myself a Webster dictionary to see the differences between British English and American English. Sometimes it's quite a different nuance or a word has a secondary meaning.

Afrikaans is interesting and so is Vlaams (Belgium). The last is still easy to understand for the Dutch, but Afrikaans is a lot harder. Funny that LOL means exactly that in Dutch
Laughing
[/CENTER]
 
HexHammer
 
Reply Wed 7 Feb, 2018 05:42 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy wrote:

HexHammer;142211 wrote:
I'm quite sure it does.

The Goths (germans) was in the end of Roman Empire the henchmen, since romans grew decadent and didn't wanna do the dirtywork themselfs. Even a huge crowd of Goths was allowed to immigrate to an area north east of Italy, and thereby the Goths evolved their language based on latin.

It's a fact that old danish are heavily influenced by german language. Also danes would tour most of europe by year 800+ and let our language evolve by that.


According to my best knowledge, the Romance languages are derived from Latin. The Scandinavian languages are not. Both the Romance and the Scandinavian languages are derived from Indo-European, which is, in turn, derived from Sanskrit.
Having a 2nd look at it, I think u'r right! Curses on my stubborn nature!
 
 

 
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