Da Vinci's resume!

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Reply Wed 3 Feb, 2010 08:09 pm
Leonardo on the job hunt!

Even Leonardo da Vinci needed a job at one point or another. Check out the high resolution scan of his application to the Duke of Milan. I think I like the guy even more after I see what kind of hand writing he had, which to me looks very dynamic and unpredictable (his E's look pretty cool). I know a little Italian, so it's interesting to compare the old conjugations (especially avere and fare) of archaic Italian and the modern language. Anyway, here is a translation and the high resolution scan.

http://i46.tinypic.com/2mfloj8.jpg[INDENT]
Quote:
Most Illustrious Lord, Having now sufficiently considered the specimens of all those who proclaim themselves skilled contrivers of instruments of war, and that the invention and operation of the said instruments are nothing different from those in common use: I shall endeavor, without prejudice to any one else, to explain myself to your Excellency, showing your Lordship my secret, and then offering them to your best pleasure and approbation to work with effect at opportune moments on all those things which, in part, shall be briefly noted below.[INDENT]
1. I have a sort of extremely light and strong bridges, adapted to be most easily carried, and with them you may pursue, and at any time flee from the enemy; and others, secure and indestructible by fire and battle, easy and convenient to lift and place. Also methods of burning and destroying those of the enemy.

2. I know how, when a place is besieged, to take the water out of the trenches, and make endless variety of bridges, and covered ways and ladders, and other machines pertaining to such expeditions.

3. If, by reason of the height of the banks, or the strength of the place and its position, it is impossible, when besieging a place, to avail oneself of the plan of bombardment, I have methods for destroying every rock or other fortress, even if it were founded on a rock, etc.

4. Again, I have kinds of mortars; most convenient and easy to carry; and with these I can fling small stones almost resembling a storm; and with the smoke of these cause great terror to the enemy, to his great detriment and confusion.

5. And if the fight should be at sea I have kinds of many machines most efficient for offense and defense; and vessels which will resist the attack of the largest guns and powder and fumes.

6. I have means by secret and tortuous mines and ways, made without noise, to reach a designated spot, even if it were needed to pass under a trench or a river.

7. I will make covered chariots, safe and unattackable, which, entering among the enemy with their artillery, there is no body of men so great but they would break them. And behind these, infantry could follow quite unhurt and without any hindrance.

8. In case of need I will make big guns, mortars, and light ordnance of fine and useful forms, out of the common type.

9. Where the operation of bombardment might fail, I would contrive catapults, mangonels, trabocchi, and other machines of marvellous efficacy and not in common use. And in short, according to the variety of cases, I can contrive various and endless means of offense and defense.

10. In times of peace I believe I can give perfect satisfaction and to the equal of any other in architecture and the composition of buildings public and private; and in guiding water from one place to another.

11. I can carry out sculpture in marble, bronze, or clay, and also I can do in painting whatever may be done, as well as any other, be he who he may.

Again, the bronze horse may be taken in hand, which is to be to the immortal glory and eternal honor of the prince your father of happy memory, and of the illustrious house of Sforza.
And if any of the above-named things seem to anyone to be impossible or not feasible, I am most ready to make the experiment in your park, or in whatever place may please your Excellency - to whom I comment myself with the utmost humility, etc.
[/INDENT]
[/INDENT]Who wouldn't want to hire a guy who can make,"kinds of mortars; most convenient and easy to carry; which can fling small stones almost resembling a storm." Leonardo, if you work for peanuts, you're hired. Anyone else have any interesting things to point out about his resume?
 
Jebediah
 
Reply Wed 3 Feb, 2010 08:26 pm
@VideCorSpoon,
That's amazing. His claims are so outrageous at times--"Covered chariots, safe and unattackable"? I wonder if he was overconfident or if it was just the style of the time.
 
Deckard
 
Reply Wed 3 Feb, 2010 09:12 pm
@VideCorSpoon,
Pretty sloppy looking resume. I wouldn't hire him.
 
VideCorSpoon
 
Reply Wed 3 Feb, 2010 09:28 pm
@Deckard,
 
Pepijn Sweep
 
Reply Thu 4 Feb, 2010 03:43 am
@VideCorSpoon,
Italy wasn't a country at the time. The Duke from Milan was fighting to stop the French king invading and conquer Lombardije. Both Charles I from Castillia-Leon, Aragon, Napels and the Scilias and Frances I from France competed for Holy Roman Eperership. It was a complex war between the Holy Roman Empire and the French in union with the Ottoman. Charles had to fight wars on all borders of his Empire Leonardo tried to help the conceived good cause.

The bronzen horse was melted down, Milan fell anyway to the French. Leonard was received at the French court and constucted private and public buildings. That's how the Mona Lisa arrived in Paris Louvre.
 
William
 
Reply Thu 4 Feb, 2010 06:47 am
@VideCorSpoon,
Who do you think would be the Leonardo of this day and time? Any suggestions?

William
 
Jebediah
 
Reply Thu 4 Feb, 2010 08:45 am
@VideCorSpoon,
In our day you have to specialize more to succeed. Maybe our Da Vinci designs stealth bombers Very Happy
 
Pepijn Sweep
 
Reply Thu 4 Feb, 2010 12:06 pm
@Jebediah,
Jebediah;124876 wrote:
In our day you have to specialize more to succeed. Maybe our Da Vinci designs stealth bombers Very Happy


What a waste of American talent.

And Chinese wisdom.:flowers:
 
VideCorSpoon
 
Reply Thu 4 Feb, 2010 05:36 pm
@Pepijn Sweep,
Pepijn Sweep;124850 wrote:
Italy wasn't a country at the time. The Duke from Milan was fighting to stop the French king invading and conquer Lombardije. Both Charles I from Castillia-Leon, Aragon, Napels and the Scilias and Frances I from France competed for Holy Roman Eperership. It was a complex war between the Holy Roman Empire and the French in union with the Ottoman. Charles had to fight wars on all borders of his Empire Leonardo tried to help the conceived good cause.

The bronzen horse was melted down, Milan fell anyway to the French. Leonard was received at the French court and constucted private and public buildings. That's how the Mona Lisa arrived in Paris Louvre.

The neat thing to note on this is that Italy would not become a nation itself until Francis II capitulated at Gaeta in 1861. In fact, the very next month after the surrender in February and the establishment of the "kingdom of Italy," under Vittorio Emanuele II, Italy was still not unified because Venice and Rome were still not consolidated. Arguably, Italy still is not unified even today because of the independency of Vatican city.
This is all somewhat interesting because it says something about Leonardo I think. The fractured nature of Italian history (both in terms of nationality, etc) reflects on Leonardo and his works and how transient he was (between nations and the Italian city states). Leonardo himself was virtually all over the place. He was in Milan, Florence, Rome, France, and was retained by the various powerhouses of the day, such as the Medici, the Borgia's, etc. He also was commissioned to do his greatest works not in one single place, but all over.

William;124862 wrote:
Who do you think would be the Leonardo of this day and time? Any suggestions?
 
Pepijn Sweep
 
Reply Fri 5 Feb, 2010 11:06 am
@VideCorSpoon,
Or Michelangelo!
 
Pepijn Sweep
 
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 02:54 pm
@VideCorSpoon,
Re-reading Machiavelli, Il Principe. You know Caesare Borgio was nicknamed Valentino?
 
Pepijn Sweep
 
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2010 12:02 pm
@VideCorSpoon,
:)What about Machiavelli?
 
VideCorSpoon
 
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2010 12:58 pm
@Pepijn Sweep,
There was actually a time when you had Niccolo Machiavelli, Leonardo da Vinci, and Caesar Borgia all in the same place at the same time, literally in the same court. That bit of historical awesomeness is a really cool story, and would make for heck of a good movie.

You have Niccolo Machiavelli who was an emissary sent by the Florentine's to see what the heck Caesar Borgia was up to, you have Caesar Borgia himself who was just as ruthless as Machiavelli (but actually more so), and Leonardo, who had been hired by Borgia to improve defensive positions in Romagna and was virtually given carte blanche to do what he pleased in manners of innovation in war machinery and what not.

Apparently, Machiavelli and Borgia got along rather well, but each knew about the others malign intentions. Leonardo himself was more aloof to the whole situation in general, which is interesting because that it gives us a very in depth look at Leonardo himself. The current understanding of the man Leonardo was that he would on many occasions grow bored with one subject and move on to another, which explains many things. It explains why his notes are so varied and sporadic. It also explains why he came to be in the service of Borgia due to the fact that Leonardo had simply grown tired of art and wanted to pursue scientific innovation. Some scholars believe he may have suffered from ADHD or moderate depression, which honestly does explain a lot, such as the secretive nature of his notes and his removed demeanor, and his erratic sleeping pattern (he slept an hour for every three hours he was awake, thereby adding more hours to his day).

And in an interesting addition to the OP, the resume that is posted to the Duke of Milan (which Leonardo did get the job, so nobody worry about that) came before Leonardo's work for the king of France, and then to the employ of Caesar Borgia. And during these later years, the work in his notebooks correspond to his disinterest with art in particular. Indeed, the resume mentions multiple accounts of engineering and military technology and only a passing mention of art.

It's amazing because on a superficial level, we tend to look at the man Leonardo da Vinci as a dyed in the wool faultless genius, a larger than life person. But in reality, I would think he would have been evaluated with psychosis by today's standards.
 
Pepijn Sweep
 
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2010 01:13 pm
@VideCorSpoon,
Psychosis was considered by ME peoples as thought by Hermes Rod on the head. I heard somewhere... The Hermetic tradition do not believe in hitting others. Or giving Ritalin.
 
Pepijn Sweep
 
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2010 03:00 am
@VideCorSpoon,
Probably with a histronic pd on the second axis. Did you know the mnemonic for this is PRAISE ME? According to Wiki...
 
 

 
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