What professional/grad student philosophers think.

  1. Philosophy Forum
  2. » General Discussion
  3. » What professional/grad student philosophers think.

Get Email Updates Email this Topic Print this Page

Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2010 09:27 am
The PhilPapers Surveys
 
jgweed
 
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2010 11:10 am
@kennethamy,
The results may be skewed by the predominance of Americans polled. The individuals reponsible admit, moreover, "We considered incorporating questions drawn from non-analytic traditions, but it proved difficult to find questions that would be accessible enough to a predominantly analytic audience. So we decided to explicitly orient the survey toward analytic philosophy, which is the tradition within which our own expertise lies."

Still, it is what it is, and represents the thinking of those who responded.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Sat 9 Jan, 2010 11:32 am
@jgweed,
jgweed;118821 wrote:
The results may be skewed by the predominance of Americans polled. The individuals reponsible admit, moreover, "We considered incorporating questions drawn from non-analytic traditions, but it proved difficult to find questions that would be accessible enough to a predominantly analytic audience. So we decided to explicitly orient the survey toward analytic philosophy, which is the tradition within which our own expertise lies."

Still, it is what it is, and represents the thinking of those who responded.


Yes. What mostly analytic philosophers think about mostly analytic questions.
 
Pyrrho
 
Reply Tue 12 Jan, 2010 11:57 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;118808 wrote:


It is interesting.

I am mildly surprised that, with every demographic, Hume is at the top of the "Non-living philosophers most identified with"; see:

Demographic statistics | PhilPapers Surveys

From there, one can select the various population options, and click on "refresh" on the page to load up each to examine.

Who is second, though, varies according to the group selected.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Tue 12 Jan, 2010 12:20 pm
@Pyrrho,
Pyrrho;119390 wrote:
It is interesting.

I am mildly surprised that, with every demographic, Hume is at the top of the "Non-living philosophers most identified with"; see:

Demographic statistics | PhilPapers Surveys

From there, one can select the various population options, and click on "refresh" on the page to load up each to examine.

Who is second, though, varies according to the group selected.


Shows good taste among professionals. It is probable that Hume is the greatest of all philosophers. The questions are interesting too. Not too specific; not too general.
 
Pyrrho
 
Reply Tue 12 Jan, 2010 01:05 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;119393 wrote:
Shows good taste among professionals. It is probable that Hume is the greatest of all philosophers. The questions are interesting too. Not too specific; not too general.


Probable? How can you say such a thing? He absolutely is the greatest philosopher who ever lived!
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Tue 12 Jan, 2010 03:08 pm
@Pyrrho,
Pyrrho;119407 wrote:
Probable? How can you say such a thing? He absolutely is the greatest philosopher who ever lived!


I always except myself from that kind of thing. But he was pretty, pretty, good. (As Larry David might say).
 
Pyrrho
 
Reply Tue 12 Jan, 2010 03:12 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;119441 wrote:
I always except myself from that kind of thing. But he was pretty, pretty, good. (As Larry David might say).


If you point us in the direction of a book you wrote that is half as good as either of Hume's Enquiries, I will be very impressed.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Tue 12 Jan, 2010 03:17 pm
@Pyrrho,
Pyrrho;119443 wrote:
If you point us in the direction of a book you wrote that is half as good as either of Hume's Enquiries, I will be very impressed.



An eighth? I am not sure of the direction the book is from where I am.
 
Kielicious
 
Reply Tue 12 Jan, 2010 04:18 pm
@kennethamy,
I was hoping the demographics were more even, especially nationality and gender, but still a great poll and some of the stats were surprising too.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Tue 12 Jan, 2010 04:40 pm
@Kielicious,
Kielicious;119467 wrote:
I was hoping the demographics were more even, especially nationality and gender, but still a great poll and some of the stats were surprising too.


American, and there are still a lot more males than females in philosophy. And yes, more thought aesthetics objective than subjective.
 
Pyrrho
 
Reply Tue 12 Jan, 2010 06:27 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;119478 wrote:
American, and there are still a lot more males than females in philosophy. And yes, more thought aesthetics objective than subjective.


You must be looking at it "coarse". If you set the "response details" to "fine", you will see (for faculty):

Quote:
Aesthetic value: objective or subjective?

Lean toward: objective 252 / 931 (27%)
Lean toward: subjective 181 / 931 (19.4%)
Accept: subjective 140 / 931 (15%)
Accept: objective 130 / 931 (13.9%)
Accept an intermediate view 61 / 931 (6.5%)
The question is too unclear to answer 42 / 931 (4.5%)
Agnostic/undecided 30 / 931 (3.2%)
Insufficiently familiar with the issue 29 / 931 (3.1%)
Accept another alternative 24 / 931 (2.5%)
Accept both 24 / 931 (2.5%)
Reject both 9 / 931 (0.9%)
Skip 4 / 931 (0.4%)
Other 3 / 931 (0.3%)
There is no fact of the matter 2 / 931 (0.2%)

Preliminary Survey results | PhilPapers Surveys

More faculty members "lean" toward objective than subjective, but more actually "accept" subjective rather than objective.
 
 

 
  1. Philosophy Forum
  2. » General Discussion
  3. » What professional/grad student philosophers think.
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.02 seconds on 07/29/2021 at 03:34:39