Anyone gone from LPN to RN?

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Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 12:10 pm
Anyone gone from LPN to RN?
I'm considering going for RN (Associate Degree) from my current LPN status. Has anyone done this, and if you did, did you go to a brick and mortar school, or online?

Were the boards harder, or easier (considering not only new knowledge, but experience and all)? Shocked

What was your experience with going back to school (in my own case it has been many years). What was the hardest thing about making the change?

Did you find it was worth the effort, particularly if you continued to work in the same place? Any problems in being seen as an RN after working there as an LPN?

I'm full of questions, but no answers! Help!

Thanks for responding! Mr. Green
 
Wildflower63 1
 
Reply Sun 10 Jul, 2005 08:45 am
I have not done this myself, but went to a university that gave credit to LPNs. That same university no longer accepts associate degree RNs as reasonable. Today their program is for a bachelors degree, only.

My first question is your age. This determines whether or not it really is worth it. This cost money and time you could be spending working, so the cost isn't just tuition at all. It is loss of wages and whether or not it is really worth getting your RN.

No university gives any LPN anything much beyond a few classes you don't have to take. You will be lucky to make a semester out of what they give you credit for, if you are opting for attending a university that still does associate degree nursing and doesn't find that beneath them.

My advice to anyone is dependent on your age, family obligation, and financial need to keep working. I don't know that, so I am going to assume financial need and probability of children to support. I would advise you to get your RN by correspondence. Your study is very flexible. At the end of study, you show up in some selected city, for about a week for clinical test. You should know sterile procedure and don't screw up or take it lightly. No one is going to give you any slack.

I know a few RNs that got started out as an LPN, with family and financial obligation, still work, but cut back a bit to study. One of the people I know is now a DON. They are correspondence RNs, but all the same, an RN. If you are young, without financial obligation, go to a university. You wont regret it.

My advice is very dependent on your age and financial circumstance. You didn't post that, so I have to go conservative and assume you have to work and need the income. Go for correspondence RN.

To answer one of your questions, get your RN and change jobs. Being a nurse is rough and plenty of people who want to criticize you. The fact that you got your RN through correspondence is something that other RNs will gossip about because you didn't take the same beating we did. If you decide on correspondence, shut up, change jobs, and do your job. The only thing anyone has to know is the fact that you are an RN, not how you got it.
 
Neznu
 
Reply Mon 11 Jul, 2005 07:39 pm
Brick and mortor vs on line degree
I'm finishing my pre recs at a junior college b/c I tried to take courses on line and found that I did not have any support or communication from the college I was taking the courses with, and every time I would try to speak with a counselor they would put me on terminal hold. But hey, they got their money...(eyebrow up)...never again will I take courses on line. Good Luck!
 
Ginger Snap
 
Reply Mon 11 Jul, 2005 11:52 pm
..
 
Ginger Snap
 
Reply Mon 11 Jul, 2005 11:53 pm
Quote:
I'm considering going for RN (Associate Degree) from my current LPN status. Has anyone done this, and if you did, did you go to a brick and mortar school, or online?

I did get an ADN after working as an LPN for 5 years. This was back in 1989-1991. Although online courses weren't available at the time, you could still do at-home course work back then. Still, I think a brick and mortar school has many advantages over online or self-study.

Quote:
What was your experience with going back to school (in my own case it has been many years). What was the hardest thing about making the change?

Just getting back into the discipline of reading, studying and taking exams. Also, juggling everything so that your work schedule doesn't conflict with your clinical schedule.

Quote:
Did you find it was worth the effort, particularly if you continued to work in the same place? Any problems in being seen as an RN after working there as an LPN?

Worth the effort? Every bit of it. I would never go back to being an LPN and for many reasons.

I chose to change my workplace as well as my specialty after graduating, so being seen as an RN was never a problem. Dealing with LPNs who complain about RNs "taking their jobs" or "not respecting LPNs" always was. You can be sympathetic with their situation up to a point, and then you begin to tire of it. If I could fight the good fight and become an RN, so could they. Blaming RNs for their plight is a waste of time and effort.
 
Wildflower63 1
 
Reply Tue 12 Jul, 2005 10:37 am
Neznu, it sounds like you really did have problems with correspondence nursing classes. It might be a good topic for nurses who have to work, and really don't have the time or flexibility, for good correspondence nursing classes.

The nurses I knew where all satisfied, with no complaint at all, but I don't know what program they chose. I do know that they had flexibility, low cost, and were able to continue working full time.

It seems the trend today is for Associate Degree RNs get their BSN. I looked up correspondence on the net. I didn't find anything I would take. I will only look at correspondence through a known university. Many universities, with a good name, offer this.

I also go for applying for federal and state grant money, which is available. That is how my degree was completely paid for. I was married, with two small children to take care of. I was on a waiting list for the LPN program, but it required too much time. I couldn't afford day care. My mother agreed to take care of my kids for a few hours, three days a week. If I was five minutes later than she expected, I got my ass chewed for socializing, which my mother refused to watch my kids for.

I went for my RN because I couldn't do the LPN program, where I was on a waiting list for two years. In college, I had to show up for classes and study time was flexible, but not easy with two small children. If I took evening clinicals, my husband could take care of the kids, not my mother. A two year degree took me four years to get.

I didn't have a job, but two small kids will not let you study and a husband being no help at all. I'm not sure of his words of encouragement or what they meant. I wasn't the one with an ounce of confidence, he was. It saddens me to think it was his mother who gave me the confidence and courage, not my own. Today, she hates me over an ugly divorce and I feel that loss.

I was terrified to do nothing, with a horrible marriage, worth minimum wage, with two wanted and loved small children. I was horrified to do something I wanted, go to nursing school. He encouraged me, so he wouldn't have to pull the hours at work.

He also sabotaged every single big deal test I had by pulling something, like getting arrested, causing a car wreck, starting another bloodsport fight. I don't honestly know what he was thinking, but you can imagine what I was, fear. I feared for myself and two kids and what life I could offer them.

Is it something hardwired into the male brain saying, "Nurses make good money!" In reality, we don't. We have difficult demands and earn every cent we make and it is far from 'big money'. Drag you husband to work with you, for a few shifts. I will guarantee that they will be a dreadful shade of white and need Attends because they would piss their pants before being strong enough to help a patient in need, as we do.

Personally, I am now ready to drag my 14 year old daughter to see what life really is and appreciate the paycheck I bring home. I was furious at her for being so disrespectful, at a funeral, to act like my old friend's dead father was something from a horror movie. Show some respect for my friend and her family. She knew him, but I had to force her to show respect, bow her head, say a prayer or something of meaning, if you don't believe in God.

How many grown men can't handle a funeral, which I insist my daughter show proper respect? How often do we, as nurses, help the patient and family, with compassion of end of life issues? How many grown men flip at the sight of blood, a needle, or viewing an individual without life? I think every man thinking they are so much stronger than us, nurses, would flip out on at least one of these things.

The same disrespect and lack of compassion, from my daughter, I do not ever expect to see out of a nurse, no matter what your license says, LPN, RN, NA, and who cares. We all do. We care about making a living to support our families. We care about our patients and their family. We should care about each other too, but let the Nursing Board split a tough alliance, if we could ever be level headed enough to be even stronger?

If any of us really want better working conditions, we better learn compassion and respect for each other and what each has to offer, which differs. That includes our nursing assistants also. The day we quit squabbling, like silly girls, is the day we will be paid for our work, respected, and give good patient care, even if there isn't enough of us.

Stop the criticism of your fellow nurse and assistant. Work together, using differing strengths. Respect you co-worker or we will never be respected or financially compensated for what we do. That's the whole edge that our employers have on us, we hate each other and this is sheer stupidity.

That's my story. What's yours? Why do we want to be nurses? How did you do it? Let's talk, which I am very talented at, in case you didn't notice! lol!
 
HuggyPuglet
 
Reply Tue 12 Jul, 2005 07:19 pm
And I thought I had problems!
Wildflower, I just got done reading your rant!

Wow! How can we get people like you on the nursing board?

I have never been able to figure out the board's stance on being a part of the cause of such deep divides, but I agree with you. Unless we overcome the divides we will never amount to much more than a haggling bunch of hens. But then, I'm wondering, is this what they really want? A long time ago a president said that a house divided cannot stand. Other quotes include "divide and conquer". (If we keep them backbiting each other, they won't be asking us to deal with the REAL issues."????

The first thing that people might say is to unionize, but I'm still not convinced that unionization of nurses is the right thing to do. We are in that awkward position of actually caring enough for our patients to ignore our own needs. But how should we address those needs?

I think you are absolutely right. We need to stand together. EVERY PERSON in the health care team is needed. We need to be pulling each other up, not climbing over their bodies! We need to look inside ourselves and our profession to see why we do this.

I feel bad about your marriage, but your husband sure sounds self-centered and selfish to me. Seems his attitude was to knock you down. Insecurity? Selfishness? Who knows. But you seem to be a really strong person Wildflower. You are one of the survivors and you are a stronger person and better nurse for it. I was fortunate in that my husband not only talked the talk, but walked the walk, and helped and encouraged me. I have been blessed.

Hang in there. There are more of us out here than you think - wanting to make things better for everyone involved.


Wildflower63 wrote:
Neznu, it sounds like you really did have problems with correspondence nursing classes. It might be a good topic for nurses who have to work, and really don't have the time or flexibility, for good correspondence nursing classes.

The nurses I knew where all satisfied, with no complaint at all, but I don't know what program they chose. I do know that they had flexibility, low cost, and were able to continue working full time.

It seems the trend today is for Associate Degree RNs get their BSN. I looked up correspondence on the net. I didn't find anything I would take. I will only look at correspondence through a known university. Many universities, with a good name, offer this.

I also go for applying for federal and state grant money, which is available. That is how my degree was completely paid for. I was married, with two small children to take care of. I was on a waiting list for the LPN program, but it required too much time. I couldn't afford day care. My mother agreed to take care of my kids for a few hours, three days a week. If I was five minutes later than she expected, I got my ass chewed for socializing, which my mother refused to watch my kids for.

I went for my RN because I couldn't do the LPN program, where I was on a waiting list for two years. In college, I had to show up for classes and study time was flexible, but not easy with two small children. If I took evening clinicals, my husband could take care of the kids, not my mother. A two year degree took me four years to get.

I didn't have a job, but two small kids will not let you study and a husband being no help at all. I'm not sure of his words of encouragement or what they meant. I wasn't the one with an ounce of confidence, he was. It saddens me to think it was his mother who gave me the confidence and courage, not my own. Today, she hates me over an ugly divorce and I feel that loss.

I was terrified to do nothing, with a horrible marriage, worth minimum wage, with two wanted and loved small children. I was horrified to do something I wanted, go to nursing school. He encouraged me, so he wouldn't have to pull the hours at work.

He also sabotaged every single big deal test I had by pulling something, like getting arrested, causing a car wreck, starting another bloodsport fight. I don't honestly know what he was thinking, but you can imagine what I was, fear. I feared for myself and two kids and what life I could offer them.

Is it something hardwired into the male brain saying, "Nurses make good money!" In reality, we don't. We have difficult demands and earn every cent we make and it is far from 'big money'. Drag you husband to work with you, for a few shifts. I will guarantee that they will be a dreadful shade of white and need Attends because they would piss their pants before being strong enough to help a patient in need, as we do.

Personally, I am now ready to drag my 14 year old daughter to see what life really is and appreciate the paycheck I bring home. I was furious at her for being so disrespectful, at a funeral, to act like my old friend's dead father was something from a horror movie. Show some respect for my friend and her family. She knew him, but I had to force her to show respect, bow her head, say a prayer or something of meaning, if you don't believe in God.

How many grown men can't handle a funeral, which I insist my daughter show proper respect? How often do we, as nurses, help the patient and family, with compassion of end of life issues? How many grown men flip at the sight of blood, a needle, or viewing an individual without life? I think every man thinking they are so much stronger than us, nurses, would flip out on at least one of these things.

The same disrespect and lack of compassion, from my daughter, I do not ever expect to see out of a nurse, no matter what your license says, LPN, RN, NA, and who cares. We all do. We care about making a living to support our families. We care about our patients and their family. We should care about each other too, but let the Nursing Board split a tough alliance, if we could ever be level headed enough to be even stronger?

If any of us really want better working conditions, we better learn compassion and respect for each other and what each has to offer, which differs. That includes our nursing assistants also. The day we quit squabbling, like silly girls, is the day we will be paid for our work, respected, and give good patient care, even if there isn't enough of us.

Stop the criticism of your fellow nurse and assistant. Work together, using differing strengths. Respect you co-worker or we will never be respected or financially compensated for what we do. That's the whole edge that our employers have on us, we hate each other and this is sheer stupidity.

That's my story. What's yours? Why do we want to be nurses? How did you do it? Let's talk, which I am very talented at, in case you didn't notice! lol!
 
icugirlfriend
 
Reply Tue 12 Jul, 2005 11:59 pm
I started working in my hospital as a tech while i worked throught nursing school, after i finishe 3 semesters of med/surg, i worked under am lpn permit, to start the transition from tech to nurse. I the finished school, and have been an RN at the same hospital for over a year now.
I will say that working my way up through the ranks, gave me an upper hand in many ways. For one, I have a better understanding of the job of a med tech, and the job and expectations of the LPN, because i have done both of those jobs. The one place i did find difficulty was the change in some of the med techs and some of the LPNs after I became an RN. There were a few noses bent out of shape and i think i had to prove my self in my new role. But it has all worked out well.
If you do go back to school for your RN, i wouldn't brag about being an LPN. Instructors love to watch you for a know it all attitude, and set you up to fail. For your own good they'll say
Best of Luck
 
HuggyPuglet
 
Reply Wed 13 Jul, 2005 08:26 am
Thank you to everyone!
I am learning alot here and I really appreciate all of your sage advice and the time you have taken to respond. Very Happy
 
Wildflower63 1
 
Reply Wed 13 Jul, 2005 04:13 pm
Huggy, thanks for putting up with my soap box rant and all other members who lived through that one too. We are all nurses who made it through nursing school, the first barrier to test us. We do a very difficult job that most people couldn't do. We have families, bills, and a tough career. This is one job they can't export to a foreign country.

I think the point that any division of nursing, from NA to NP, is probably a fantastic idea for administration that does what? Cuts our pay to profit? Gives us a skeleton crew to work? Who are Nursing Board members, but administration.

I think you are right, Huggy. The Nursing Board is out to please industry, not nurses. United, we could be a real pain in the ass. We could demand adequate pay and staffing for our work, but can't if all we want to do is play their game of status and not supporting each other.
 
MILLIEWILLIS
 
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2005 04:15 pm
I got my RN (assoc) after being a Lpn for 10years. Went to a community college on the weekends for 1 year. great program best thing I ever did. Boards were easy only took me 45min to complete. The school I went to had a 96% pass rate. That was one of my criteria for picking that particular school. Good Luck
 
Wildflower63 1
 
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2005 04:27 pm
At least you went into the NCLEX with confidence, being a LPN. I took mine the first year they went to computers. The thing shut down. I almost had a heart attack wondering if I screwed it up and failed. I passed, but bit my nails waiting for the results. Has that computer NCLEX given anyone else a heart attack?
 
crazybeachbumm
 
Reply Thu 4 Aug, 2005 05:54 pm
LPN to RN
I was a LPN before I went back to school and got my RN degree. I did attend a college for the program and I think that would be the best way to go because there are clinicals and it allows you to practice the skills you will need as a RN. When I took boards, they consisted of 2 days of fill in the bubble type questions. Now, it's all computerized and you have your results within a couple of days. A nurse I work with just recently took RN boards and she said that you are not required to answer that many questions and the amount is based on whether or not you get the correct response. She had her results within 72 hours after taking her test.

I am currently enrolled in a RN to BSN and doing it on line. It is much more difficult to do because there isn't the interaction between students and the instructors, but it fits my personal schedule better than the standard school. However, if I could attend, I think I would go the conventional way for at least a few of the classes, especially math!
Sad
 
Cindy 1
 
Reply Thu 4 Aug, 2005 06:37 pm
I was an LPN for 9 years when I obtained my Associates degree through an external degree program. I worked full-time with alot of OT as an LPN while earning credits independently for my degree. You do need a strong acute setting background/knowledge base to be successful. I don't recall the exact percentage of students that pass the first time, but think it was about 50%. I went through NYS Regents College, now known as Excelsior. It is more difficult this way because you study independently. And the clinical exam is probably the most stressful experience I'd ever endured. But I'd do it again in a heartbeat.

I continued to work at the same facility as an RN, and within 4 months, became a Charge Nurse. I was in charge of RN's that had once covered me as an LPN. I did worry how my peers would accept me once I became an RN. With the exception of a couple people, I was welcomed warmly into my new role. I remained in the CN position for 8 years, and am now preparing to travel.

If you are employed in a health facility, check with your HR department and ask about tuition reimbursement. My employer paid 95% of my education costs. You may have to sign a contract to continue your employment for a stated length of time.

My LPN boards took place over 2 days, fill in hte bubbles. RN boards, on the computer, and yes, it was nerve wracking when the computer shut down so quick.

That's my experience. Hope that helps.
 
squeaky
 
Reply Sat 6 Aug, 2005 06:32 am
lpn to rn.
If you really want to go from LPN to RN. Go for it. It will be hard but at the end it will be worth it. I know of company that is home based program. There will sent you your course information and you have to go to test center to take your exams. Then once you are finished with the classroom you have one weekend to do your clinicals. I hope this information will help you. Smile
 
dfrey39hotmailcom
 
Reply Sun 7 Aug, 2005 11:36 am
I just finished a part-time program in the Tacoma area. It took me about 1 1/2 years to get my RN, but it was worth it and I now work in the local NICU's. If you have a dream to become a RN, don't let anyone nay say you. It can be done, no it isn't easy and yes you can do it while working and raising a family Laughing , I did and so did a lot of my classmates. By the way we were all LPN's.

Now to answer some of your questions. My school was both the old brick and morter and online. We had assignments that we turned in online. We physically went to the classroom once a week one term and then twice a week to clinicals the next term. This left you with plenty of time to get your assignments done and to work part or fulltime.

Both Boards are hard, study, study study....and then study some more. Our class had a 100% pass rate, we did study groups and on your own. The important thing is not so much the answer, but the why of that answer.

I didn't work in the same place, however some of the girls in my class do. They face those issues head on, one thing you can do is ask for the workplace to give you an orientation period with one of your co-workers and see if that helps it did my classmates.

Any other questions? I would be happy to help.
 
head ed nurse
 
Reply Sun 7 Aug, 2005 11:11 pm
LPN to RN
I am currently taking correspondence courses through Excelsior College. I've been an LPN for 10 years and ended up w/ a back injury (not nursing related!) that has me out of work for approx. 8-10 months, so I thought I'd use my time wisely. There is a book recommended to me by the college called LPN to RN Transition. It gives you info on how to get yourself back into the swing of things and then what to expect once you finish your degree. Yes, a traditional university would be easier I believe, but if you have the determination and ability to take the time to study, do your thing....GOOD LUCK!
 
Nurseangel18
 
Reply Mon 8 Aug, 2005 09:04 pm
LPN to RN
HI,

This is my first time posting here. It is nice to meet you, sort of. Smile

I was an LPN for 5 years when I returned to get my RN at Northern Virginia Community College. We were given 7 quarter credits for our previous LPN training.

I was married, working and had 2 kids, so time was limited. To gain the core credits I needed, the first thing I did was to take the Clep exam in College English. I got a perfect score for that, then took college math, passed that test by the skin of my teeth. I then signed up for weekend classes where I completed one year of credits in psych and sociology. I also took "exteneded learning classes" to fill one credit requirements like PE credits and library skills for freshman. So, it took me only one year and one semester to graduate.

I found clinicals to be so simple that we LPN's had to find things to do. We were always done with our assignments long before the generic students. Nursing classes were much easier, too.

I graduated Magna Cum Laude with a 9.86 average.

The boards were so easy, that I thought I must have failed. But, I passed it no problems.

If you are thinking of going for it and it means a lot to you to do it, then go for it. If it is what you really want. One tip, though, keep quiet about being and LPN unless asked directly. Some instructors do not like LPN's and will give you the hardest patients and grade you harder than generic students. If they ask you admit, just don't flaunt it.

Good luck. You will make it.

Nurseangel18
 
Justanurse
 
Reply Sat 10 Sep, 2005 07:01 pm
I got my RN degree from Regents (now called Excelisor) after being an LPN for 5 years. I did not find the courses that challenging due to having worked med/surg and as most of us know LPN's in small hospitals do almost everything that the RN's do. I got the same money when I graduated and I didnt fell as stressed as I would having to find time for the brick school
 
dmflower
 
Reply Sat 10 Sep, 2005 10:22 pm
The Absolute best of wishes to all of you who are trying to enhance your education. It will ony enhance the field of nursing...nursing should have the most educated people that it can afford, taking care of people. Teachers are required to have a masters degree because it has been shown to be effective in teacing I beleve the same about nursing... Maybe then we will get the same retierment benefits....
 
 

 
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