What is the difference between a fool and a wise man?

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Reply Thu 3 Mar, 2011 08:42 am
"The wise man doubts often, and his views are changeable. The fool is constant in his opinions, and doubts nothing, because he knows everything, except his own ignorance" (Pharaoh Akhenaton, c.1250BCE)

Discuss.
 
Alan Masterman
 
Reply Sat 5 Mar, 2011 04:40 am
@Alan Masterman,
Alan Masterman wrote:

"The wise man doubts often, and his views are changeable. The fool is constant in his opinions, and doubts nothing, because he knows everything, except his own ignorance" (Pharaoh Akhenaton, c.1250BCE)

Discuss.


This seems to me to be a very subversive text. It might be taken to imply that most religious believers are fools. Maybe even most politicians too. And anybody can tell you that our politicians are the cream of the nation's intelligentsia!!!
 
Neil D
 
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 09:27 pm
I think one difference is brain composition. Different brain compositions will yield varying intellects. This seems obvious. To go further, I would have to understand what components are required to form a complete human personality. Does there exist something discrete, such as consciousness that may be the same or different for each person. Or is "being", thinking, feeling, and the like, just a product of brain composition/body chemistry. If the former then the precise answer is unknowable at the present.
 
-Ramen Lord-
 
Reply Fri 18 Mar, 2011 06:29 am
@Neil D,
Neil D wrote:

I think one difference is brain composition. Different brain compositions will yield varying intellects. This seems obvious. To go further, I would have to understand what components are required to form a complete human personality. Does there exist something discrete, such as consciousness that may be the same or different for each person. Or is "being", thinking, feeling, and the like, just a product of brain composition/body chemistry. If the former then the precise answer is unknowable at the present.

When you say Brain Composition, do you mean the physical ratio between their brains? Because intelligence isn't based on how many cells your brain pops out.
A wise man learns from his mistakes. A fool doesn't.
 
hamilton
 
Reply Fri 18 Mar, 2011 05:25 pm
@Alan Masterman,
Alan Masterman wrote:

"The wise man doubts often, and his views are changeable. The fool is constant in his opinions, and doubts nothing, because he knows everything, except his own ignorance" (Pharaoh Akhenaton, c.1250BCE)

i agree. this makes sense, although, wise men are ignorant, as well, but they will change according to that, at least.
 
ugimaflip
 
Reply Mon 28 Mar, 2011 01:25 am
@Alan Masterman,
Afool doth think he is clever a wiseman knows himself to be a fool.......
 
crazy-buck
 
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2011 04:40 am
@Alan Masterman,
A fool is a moron who doesn't have enough knowledge and A Wise is the one who does things in a best why he/she can. and you can make out by the way, they deal with the things.
 
hamilton
 
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2011 01:59 pm
@crazy-buck,
crazy-buck wrote:

A fool is a moron who doesn't have enough knowledge and A Wise is the one who does things in a best why he/she can. and you can make out by the way, they deal with the things.

a fool thinks himself wise, while a wise man thinks himself a fool. but having knowledge is not the difference between a wise man and a fool. however as alan masterman put it, i must agree.
 
Tifinden
 
Reply Fri 13 May, 2011 05:32 pm
@Alan Masterman,
A fool doesn't comprehend his vice, blunders, or flagrance. A wise man possesses adequate knowledge prior to any possible err in order to avoid any such failure. "A fool picks fruit and places the product in a torn basket, and a wise man, picks a basket which will hold the fruit"- or he mends the torn basket in an assertive manner- in the end, the wise man eats fruit gaily from a basket, and the fool is still picking.
"A wise man sat down to a table for a meal. He began to eat, when a supposed fool stumbled hither from a local tavern. The wise man bade him sit, and the fool obliged. The following day, the wise man entered the tavern to attempt to locate the fool and find of him his name. The wise man saw the fool sitting morosely and inert in a corner. However, when the wise man entreated him to speak, the fool dismissed him sourly. With such abrasion the wise man was not prepared to contend with, nor had he any intention in doing so. The wise man consequently and briskly left the pub, whereupon the fool beseeched him to return to the table..."
Who is the wise man and who the fool?- I'd appreciate hearing what the populace interpret from this small and ambiguous little writing- if at all, disregard the latter writing, and only hold relevance to the first few sentences!!!
 
Tifinden
 
Reply Fri 13 May, 2011 05:42 pm
@hamilton,
A wise man does not think himself a fool- wherein he thinks highly enough of himself to understand the manner required to avoid succumbing to the mentality of the fool- however, the fool may think himself a wise man- that does seem more relevant, but once again, a wise man thinking himself a fool, simply written to comply with the former statement, in literary paradox, is paradoxical and contradictory, it belies, the definition of a supposed wise man. A wise man is the result of one to whom others may travel for advice and insight, a wise man is one who understands and perceives much in an erudite and analytical manner which does not apply to many- whether it be the wise man in the mountain, or the elderly man who lives across the street in solitude, a wise man is exceptional. Also, a wise man may prove actually to be a fool by one yet wiser, yet once again, he would most likely never think himself a fool. Where a wise man sees, others are blind. A wise man is the caricature of the understanding of all four plus four, four minus negative four, and four plus four- he understands the difference, this is a rudimentary example, and beholds the reason for the difference for he would understand both algebra, mathematics, perhaps linear equations, sociology, and psychology,
 
hamilton
 
Reply Sun 15 May, 2011 12:43 pm
@Tifinden,
Tifinden wrote:

A wise man does not think himself a fool- wherein he thinks highly enough of himself to understand the manner required to avoid succumbing to the mentality of the fool- however, the fool may think himself a wise man- that does seem more relevant, but once again, a wise man thinking himself a fool, simply written to comply with the former statement, in literary paradox, is paradoxical and contradictory, it belies, the definition of a supposed wise man. A wise man is the result of one to whom others may travel for advice and insight, a wise man is one who understands and perceives much in an erudite and analytical manner which does not apply to many- whether it be the wise man in the mountain, or the elderly man who lives across the street in solitude, a wise man is exceptional. Also, a wise man may prove actually to be a fool by one yet wiser, yet once again, he would most likely never think himself a fool. Where a wise man sees, others are blind. A wise man is the caricature of the understanding of all four plus four, four minus negative four, and four plus four- he understands the difference, this is a rudimentary example, and beholds the reason for the difference for he would understand both algebra, mathematics, perhaps linear equations, sociology, and psychology,

ok. thats right....
 
chaz wyman
 
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 05:07 am
@Alan Masterman,
It's an interesting attribution, but where did the quote really come from?
 
Jack Master
 
Reply Fri 20 May, 2011 06:59 am
In my opinion, the essential difference between a fool and a wise man, is experience and knowledge and the capability to assimilate it.
 
r3lax187
 
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2011 08:00 pm
@Alan Masterman,
i agree with op's quote.

In my opinion the biggest difference would be awareness.

awareness of consequences of the results of thoughts,speech and actions in addition to not being "wrong".

That being said what is "wrong" is a matter of inclination and taste.-due to emotivism.

also awareness is 10x>knowledge.
and knowledge can be divided into scribe knowledge (words,facts,information) and warrior knowledge which aids in developing skills to use in difficult situations in mental, physical,spiritual, aesthetical and psychological aspects.

 
smokey888x2
 
Reply Sun 25 Dec, 2011 11:40 pm
There is no differences. It is all dependent on the psychological (state) reception of one receiving the information. And I might add, you're never right until such time as your psychologically right. In other words, you can have the right answer right on the spot perfect (!) but if the person hearing you are closed to the whole bit, you will never be right in that person's state.

It should be noted too, that you can make a wrong judgement because maybe you left out some obvious item. Whereby later you recognize yourself as a fool and possibly others conclude the same. In those times, you take the lumps.
 
Repfixers
 
Reply Mon 26 Dec, 2011 12:52 am
@Alan Masterman,
One of the greatest characteristics of a wise person is their willingness to be instructed and corrected by the word of God. A wise person loves the correction and reproof of God's word and loves those who instruct and correct them with the word. Those who scoff at instruction and correction of God's word hate those who try to instruct them and correct them through the word. The great characteristic of a fool is his scoffing the word and hating the ones who seek to live and proclaim the word to him. The word of God is what makes the difference between a wise man and a fool.
 
chaz wyman
 
Reply Tue 27 Dec, 2011 07:26 am
@Repfixers,
A real moron is one who is arrogant enough to think that he knows the word of god, or that such a thing as the word of god is a meaningful category.

It seems to me the the words of Akhenaton, (above) were directed at such fools as you from a time when your so-called "God" did not even exist.

Akhenaton was responsible for throwing down the multitude of God's to worship the one source of natural energy - the sun. It's a shame he did not also wipe out the Jews who have propagated this fantasy that you have inherited.


 
 

 
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