Classes in the fall

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kennethamy
 
Reply Sat 8 May, 2010 01:45 am
@chopkins,
chopkins;161437 wrote:
Alright, so from the feedback Im getting, this is the layout that Im forming in my head.
First semester take ancient philosophy to gain a platform of base knowledge, then the semester after take either logic or modern philosophy, or both...


Sounds like a plan. I don't really see how taking ancient philosophy will give you "a platform of basic knowledge" unless you are talking about the history of philosophy, and not really then. It is not as if philosophy is a kind of structure with ancient philosophy as a foundation. And it is not as if unless you know a lot about Plato and Aristotle, you won't be able to understand Locke or Descartes. That's just not true. Not that you are really going to learn a lot about Plato and Aristotle in one course of introductory ancient philosophy, anyway. Don't sweat it . The sequence of courses is not particularly important. The courses can be, of course.
 
chopkins
 
Reply Sat 8 May, 2010 01:50 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;161605 wrote:
Sounds like a plan. I don't really see how taking ancient philosophy will give you "a platform of basic knowledge" unless you are talking about the history of philosophy, and not really then. It is not as if philosophy is a kind of structure with ancient philosophy as a foundation. And it is not as if unless you know a lot about Plato and Aristotle, you won't be able to understand Locke or Descartes. That's just not true. Not that you are really going to learn a lot about Plato and Aristotle in one course of introductory ancient philosophy, anyway. Don't sweat it . The sequence of courses is not particularly important. The courses can be, of course.


Well at this point Im just trying to get into one of the three classes. I was looking at the class schedules today, and with budget cutbacks there are only one or two sections in each course and they are all almost full. I dont get to register until late July, so at this point Im just holding my breath.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Sat 8 May, 2010 02:01 am
@chopkins,
chopkins;161607 wrote:
Well at this point Im just trying to get into one of the three classes. I was looking at the class schedules today, and with budget cutbacks there are only one or two sections in each course and they are all almost full. I dont get to register until late July, so at this point Im just holding my breath.


Yes, my best advice is just, don't sweat it. It really will make no difference in the long run, or even in the long short run. And do, exhale. Remember, you can cut carbon emissions by inhaling twice a much as exhaling. But, don't overdo it.
 
chopkins
 
Reply Sat 8 May, 2010 02:05 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;161609 wrote:
Yes, my best advice is just, don't sweat it. It really will make no difference in the long run, or even in the long short run. And do, exhale. Remember, you can cut carbon emissions by inhaling twice a much as exhaling. But, don't overdo it.


lol, ill keep that in mind.
 
kennethamy
 
Reply Sat 8 May, 2010 02:09 am
@chopkins,
chopkins;161610 wrote:
lol, ill keep that in mind.


Yeah. I learned that from Algore. But it is an inconvenient truth.
 
HexHammer
 
Reply Sat 8 May, 2010 02:45 am
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;161602 wrote:
Is that right?!!. I am shocked! Shocked!
 
Deckard
 
Reply Sat 8 May, 2010 03:04 am
@chopkins,
chopkins;160993 wrote:
As of right now, I have 0 background in philosophy, so whenever I try to read or argue, I fail to grasp easily, or argue affectively, the concepts or points being made. I have a choice of taking a history of modern phil. or a symbolic logic class this fall and I am torn as to which I should take first. :brickwall:

If I were you, I would take the symbolic logic class but at the same time read a book like.. say... Russell's "History of Western Philosophy" (but keep in mind Russell isn't the final word on all things philosophical just a good place to start.) The symbolic logic course is going to be tougher than the history of philosophy class; it may remind you more of a math class than what you may regard to be philosophy but try to remember that all philosophers consciously have some kind of logic at the core of their philosophies in contrast to say psychologists or sociologists who may be less conscious of the central core importance of logic.

After getting a grasp on logic through the symbolic logic course you can then take a step back and consider what makes logic, logic( i.e. you can explore metalogic). Just as the best psychology and sociology (i.e. the psychology and sociology that is or borders upon being philosophical) is fully conscious of logic so too a full understanding is illuminated by, and in some cases humbled by, psychology and sociology. And please understand I am subsuming the historical approach to philosophy (e.g. a course called "history of modern philosophy") under the rubric of the psychological/sociological.

What is logic? Where does logic begin and where does it end? Will a class in symbolic logic give you a complete answer to these questions? No, but its a good place to start.
 
HexHammer
 
Reply Sat 8 May, 2010 03:11 am
@chopkins,
chopkins;161437 wrote:
Alright, so from the feedback Im getting, this is the layout that Im forming in my head.
First semester take ancient philosophy to gain a platform of base knowledge, then the semester after take either logic or modern philosophy, or both...
Imo you should avoid classical philosophy, there's nothing but supersticion and ignorence.

Horray for spontanious genesis!! Classical philosophy does not know of things such as psycology, modern capitalism, such logic which I presented you, and it's very naive in it's ways.

Imo your intelligence will only go in negative values by wasting time with classical philosophy.

Existialism is utter nonsens, when people in here speak of can we know something doesn't exist, or does something exist? ...then I suddenly saw the immense wisdom in some chineese emperor bury all the philosophers alive.

Maybe it would be better to post some of your contraversies with wify, then it may have better chance of being solved, than you get some general advice that have a slim chance to fit your specific problems.
 
HexHammer
 
Reply Sat 8 May, 2010 05:24 am
@Deckard,
Deckard;161617 wrote:
If I were you, I would take the symbolic logic class but at the same time read a book like.. say... Russell's "History of Western Philosophy" (but keep in mind Russell isn't the final word on all things philosophical just a good place to start.) The symbolic logic course is going to be tougher than the history of philosophy class; it may remind you more of a math class than what you may regard to be philosophy but try to remember that all philosophers consciously have some kind of logic at the core of their philosophies in contrast to say psychologists or sociologists who may be less conscious of the central core importance of logic.

After getting a grasp on logic through the symbolic logic course you can then take a step back and consider what makes logic, logic( i.e. you can explore metalogic). Just as the best psychology and sociology (i.e. the psychology and sociology that is or borders upon being philosophical) is fully conscious of logic so too a full understanding is illuminated by, and in some cases humbled by, psychology and sociology. And please understand I am subsuming the historical approach to philosophy (e.g. a course called "history of modern philosophy") under the rubric of the psychological/sociological.

What is logic? Where does logic begin and where does it end? Will a class in symbolic logic give you a complete answer to these questions? No, but its a good place to start.
Maybe you can solve my logically riddle then http://www.philosophyforum.com/lounge/general-discussion/7744-greater-logic.html
 
 

 
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